panpipes


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pan·pipe

(păn′pīp′)
n. often panpipes
A simple wind instrument consisting of a series of pipes or reeds of graduated length bound together, played by blowing across the top open ends. Also called mouth organ, Pandean pipe, pan flute, syrinx.

[Pan + pipe.]

panpipes

(ˈpænˌpaɪps)
pl n
(Instruments) (often singular; often capital) a number of reeds or whistles of graduated lengths bound together to form a musical wind instrument. Also called: pipes of Pan or syrinx
Translations
panhuilu
pánsíp

panpipes

[ˈpænpaɪps] NPLzampoña f

panpipes

plPanflöte f

panpipes

[ˈpænˌpaɪps] nplFlauto msg di Pan, siringa fsg
References in periodicals archive ?
The girls made panpipes that Sacagawea might have used, raced paper planes inspired by Amelia Earhart, played games from wartime as they learned about Anne Frank, and took lessons in first aid like Mary Seacole.
Have each student make two different straw panpipes and compare the pitches of each one.
And, in the maze, we have the forest deity Pan, who has lost his precious panpipes -- "Can you help him find them?!" There's also a Story-gatherer -- "an elf who is older than the mountains and creeks, and needs your help to unlock the spell which keeps his Storybook shut" -- and even a travelling Victorian Alchemist who will be performing her magic potion tricks at the "unique and never before seen Steampunk Alchemy Show!"
The various elements combine to create an otherworldly air: Erice's painterly direction; the sumptuous cinematography of Luis Cuadrado (who was starting to go blind, from the effects of a brain tumour, during the filming (2)); and the woodwind-filled score by Luis de Pablo, whose breathy and eerie qualities will likely remind local viewers of the panpipes used in the opening theme from Picnic at Hanging Rock (Peter Weir, 1975).
Mountains are vaguely seen from a distance, sticking to the sky, jackdaws are just like tiny black dots beside the clouds, water crinkled with sunlight, but not because of the wind, I can hear the sound of panpipes and bassoon from the ferry.
He composes contemporary works sometimes calling for peanut butter jar percussion, silverware chimes, or tuned panpipes constructed from test tubes and wax.
The complainant described the football coach playing music including Billy Joel, Abracadabra by the Steve Miller Band and Cacharpaya by panpipes group Incantation as he abused him.
Panpipes and flute, symbols of music and the theatre, hang from the tree behind her.
In addition to drums, other instruments such as gourds, banjo-like instruments and quillpipes made from reeds strung together like panpipes, marimbas, and European musical instruments such as violins and tambourines.
Visual poetry dates back to ancient Greece or even earlier and was known as technopaigneia to the Greeks and as carminafigurate to the Romans; the poems were composed in the shape of wings, altars, eggs, axes, and panpipes. As Bohn contends, throughout history, "visual poets sought to 'restructure the basic vision' they had inherited" (17).
Flutes, jew's harps and panpipes are rarely used anymore but percussion instruments such as the kulap/gor rattle (shaken idiophones) made with goa bean seeds (Pangium edule), the thraml lumut bamboo percussion (idiophone) and the marap bamboo clapper are ubiquitous with music and dance, as are warup/buruburu drums, which provide the foundational sonic and rhythmic pulse of Islander communities.
Bunting flutters between speakers wafting out "Now That's What I Call Wilderness Panpipes" (or something) on a loop.