pantheist


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Related to pantheist: Panentheist

pan·the·ism

 (păn′thē-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A doctrine identifying the Deity with the universe and its phenomena.
2. Belief in and worship of all gods.

pan′the·ist n.
pan′the·is′tic, pan′the·is′ti·cal adj.
pan′the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pantheist - someone who believes that God and the universe are the same
worshipper, believer, worshiper - a person who has religious faith
Adj.1.pantheist - of or relating to pantheism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pantheist

[ˈpænθiːɪst] Npanteísta mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pantheist

nPantheist(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Rohr argues that he is not proposing a pantheist view, but rather a panentheist one.
The exegesis of Frost's "Birches" is untroubled by the possibility that it may bother a section of readers that "the boy," with his boyish antics, was a placeholder for every child, every pantheist, every poet's telepathic (engaging nearness by being afar) relationship with artistic process.
In an interview published in George Sylvester Viereck's book Glimpses of the Great, published in 1930, Einstein responded to a question about whether he defined himself as a pantheist:
Nothing in Curnow could be called 'Wordsworthian' in either a Christian or a pantheist sense: there is no reassuring adult awareness of the 'something far more deeply interfused' of 'Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey'; no sustaining 'natural piety' of 'My heart leaps up when I behold'.
He has been described as an imagist, a mystic, a symbolist, and a pantheist. While these labels may fit certain moments in his poetry, they do not individually convey the totality of his oeuvre.
In the Apologia, he states that "if it were not for this voice, speaking so clearly in my conscience and my heart, I should be an atheist, or a pantheist, or a polytheist when I looked into the world." (11) He continues, "I am far from denying the real force of the arguments in proof of a God, drawn from the general facts of human society and the course of history, but these do not warm me or enlighten me; they do not take away the winter of my desolation, or make the buds unfold and the leaves grow within me, and my moral being rejoice." (12) Conscience was the primordial messenger, the original religious experience, and so, for Newman, evangelization occurs at the level of conscience.
Blake thus moves from a panpsychist to a more radical pantheist ontology in the Marriage, and I contend that despite the differences from Leibniz that such a pantheism entails, he nevertheless remains closer to Leibniz than to Berkeley, insofar as his early metaphysics grows out of the panpsychist tradition, and it is not until his later works that he relinquishes his assertion that mentality--and divinity--are distributed through "all sensible objects," which are real and outside the human mind.
Besides this practical legacy, the enduring importance of Toland is to be found in a theoretical venture : pantheist philosophy.
* in September, an "agnostic pagan pantheist" opened a county commission meeting in Escambia County, Florida, with a two-and-a-half-minute chant invoking the elements and four directions.
Thomas McFarland shrewdly observes of Wordsworth that "in so far as he was a 'worshipper of nature' he was a pantheist and not a Christian; for a Christian worships God through Christ"; Coleridge and the Pantheist Tradition (Oxford U.