pantheistic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pan·the·ism

 (păn′thē-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A doctrine identifying the Deity with the universe and its phenomena.
2. Belief in and worship of all gods.

pan′the·ist n.
pan′the·is′tic, pan′the·is′ti·cal adj.
pan′the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pantheistic - of or relating to pantheism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pantheistic

[ˌpænθiːˈɪstɪk] ADJpanteísta
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pantheistic

[ˌpænθiˈɪstɪk] adjpanthéiste
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pantheistic

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pantheistic

[ˌpænθɪˈɪstɪk] adjpanteistico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
In this enchanted mood, thy spirit ebbs away to whence it came; becomes diffused through time and space; like Cranmer's sprinkled Pantheistic ashes, forming at last a part of every shore the round globe over.
He himself knew that, in reality, the confused beliefs which she held, apparently imbibed in childhood, were, if anything, Tractarian as to phraseology, and Pantheistic as to essence.
Pierre to Chateaubriand, from Chateaubriand to Victor Hugo; it has no doubt some obscure relationship to those pantheistic theories which have greatly occupied people's minds in many modern readings of philosophy; it makes as much difference between the modern and the earlier landscape art as there is between the roughly outlined masks of a Byzantine mosaic and a portrait by Reynolds or Romney.
Had they really closed upon her in some pantheistic embrace that made her a part of them?
According to Stewart, "America's revolutionary deism" was characterized by a persistent pantheistic conception of god, an idea that was substantially shaped by the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, whose influence was transmitted to the American revolutionaries through the writings of John Locke (36).
This is pantheistic filmmaking in a dimension yet to be explored by scientists political or otherwise.
Advocates of pantheistic philosophy would add that we can't ignore extreme, or transphysical, phenomena when using a scientific lens.
Although Romantic poetry is philosophically complicated--combining "deistic theology," "Newtonian physics," Wordsworthian "pantheistic naturalism," Coleridgean "theism," and Shelleyean conflict between French atheism and Platonic idealism--and romantic poets differ in their philosophical viewpoints, "the common feat of the romantic nature poets was to read meanings into the landscape" (Wimsatt, "The Structure" 25-31).
It awakened in my heart the pantheistic awareness that God is enshrined in the creatures, grasses, flowers, trees, rivers, mountains, fields and hill-tops which are His creation.
Differing or seemingly conflicting prophecies from different men of God does not necessarily portray God, like Abati wondered, as pantheistic; our God remains monotheistic, no matter what.
In the last chapter of his biography, Gustave Geffroy wrote: 'This is the supreme significance of Monet's art: his adoration of the universe, ending in a pantheistic and Buddhist contemplation [...] pursuing his dream of form and colour almost to the annihilation of his individuality in the eternal nirvana of things at once changing and immutable.' In the exhibition we learned that another friend of Monet, the French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau (also interested in Buddhism and oriental art), viewed the Poplars series (1891) as a 'pantheistic poem'.
(7) Whatever his awareness may have been, Blake's later prophecies abandon his early pantheistic monism and bear much less similarity to Leibniz's version of panpsychism with its conception of matter as immanently energetic and infinitely divisible.