paper-cutter

paper-cutter

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a machine for cutting paper, usually a blade mounted over a table on which paper can be aligned
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

paper-cutter

[ˈpeɪpəˌkʌtəʳ] ntaglierina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It is as flat and elastic as an ivory paper-cutter, and the lower mandible, differing from every other bird, is an inch and a half longer than the upper.
The tourists were eagerly buying all sorts and styles of paper-cutters, marked "Souvenir of the Rigi," with handles made of the little curved horn of the ostensible chamois; there were all manner of wooden goblets and such things, similarly marked.
In the case registered by the police, the mall's security management said that Sadaf also attacked them with a paper-cutter in the presence of police personnel.
Further, the mall's security management said that Sadaf also attacked them with a paper-cutter in the presence of police personnel.
Police allegedly used an industrial-strength paper-cutter to slice off the toes of Jaime Hauads shoes and threatened to cut off the then 17-year-olds toes if he didnt confess to the murders of alleged gang members Jason Goral and Jose Morales.
The artist and paper-cutter, Tausif has grown up with the traditions of Islamic art with their extraordinary geometric designs and beautiful calligraphic-inspired motifs and patterns of paper cutting, which evolved in China 2000 years ago, before travelling via the Silk Route to Central Europe, notably evolving with strongly regional variations in Austria, Poland and Germany.
When we begin to charge a subscription price for our magazine we engage to furnish a nice pink celluloid paper-cutter with each paid-up subscription; but as long as our publication goes out without charge, we trust that the patient citizen who uncomplainingly sugars his own coffee and even patiently bites the end off his own cigar, will be willing to cut his own leaves with his own pocket-knife for the sake of the grateful spiritual caffein and nicotine which await him within."--Roy Temple House, Books Abroad 4:3 (July 1930), 273