papery

(redirected from paperiness)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

pa·per·y

 (pā′pə-rē)
adj.
Resembling paper, as in thickness or texture.

pa′per·i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

papery

(ˈpeɪpərɪ)
adj
like paper, esp in thinness, flimsiness, or dryness
ˈpaperiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pa•per•y

(ˈpeɪ pə ri)

adj.
like paper, esp. in being thin or flimsy.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.papery - thin and paperlike; "papery leaves"; "wasps that make nests of papery material"
thin - of relatively small extent from one surface to the opposite or in cross section; "thin wire"; "a thin chiffon blouse"; "a thin book"; "a thin layer of paint"
2.papery - of or like paper
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

papery

adjective thin, light, flimsy, fragile, lightweight, frail, insubstantial, wafer-thin, paper-thin, paperlike the papery skin of garlic cloves
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
وَرَقِي
papírovitý
papírszerű
pappírslegur
papierovitý
incekâğıt gibi

papery

[ˈpeɪpərɪ] ADJparecido al papel
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

papery

adj plaster, pastrybröckelig, krümelig; skinpergamenten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

paper

(ˈpeipə) noun
1. the material on which these words are written, made from wood, rags etc and used for writing, printing, wrapping parcels etc. I need paper and a pen to write a letter; (also adjective) a paper bag.
2. a single (often printed or typed) piece of this. There were papers all over his desk.
3. a newspaper. Have you read the paper?
4. a group of questions for a written examination. The Latin paper was very difficult.
5. (in plural) documents proving one's identity, nationality etc. The policeman demanded my papers.
ˈpapery adjective
like paper. papery leaves.
ˈpaperback noun
a book with a paper cover.
adjective
paperback novels.
ˈpaper-clip noun
a small, usually metal clip for holding papers together. She attached her note to the papers with a paper-clip.
ˈpaper-knife noun
a knife used for opening envelopes etc.
paper sculpture
the art of modelling with folded paper.
ˈpaperweight noun
a small, heavy object which can be put on top of pieces of paper to keep them in place, also used as an ornament.
ˈpaperwork noun
the part of a job which consists of keeping files, writing letters etc. I spend most of my time on paperwork.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
For experimental technique, Kenkare and May-Plumlee [32] distinguished draping from paperiness (paper bending behaviour) by accounting for 3D deformation behavior using a drapemeter that is capable of distorting fabric samples in all three dimensions over a circular disc.
Instead of digging into "gravelly ground," in the poem "The Butts" the young hand reaches into the father's suit pockets feeling for butts only to find "Nothing but chaff cocoons,/ A paperiness not known again" until he has to "reach well in beneath" his dying father's "meagre armpit/To lift and sponge him." As haunting as the suits in Yeats' poem "The Apparitions," the suit stands in for mortality and memory and the possibility of the meaninglessness of it all.
First, one may observe that Byatt has noted her awareness of Fowles and her dislike of what she takes to be the artificiality and "paperiness" of The French Lieutenant's Woman.