papier collé

(redirected from papier colle)

papier collé

(French papje kɔle)
n
(Art Terms) a type of collage, usually of an abstract design
[French, literally: glued paper]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Made two years after the death of the Hollywood star, the corrupted flesh of this grotesque papier colle bust, presents a martyred modern icon (Vallois).
Picasso invented collage, a technique of gluing unrelated objects to a painting, and Braque introduced papier colle, the joining of paper fragments to a painting.
One touchstone here is surely the Cubist papier colle, another the related art of Romare Bearden.
VALUABLE The artwork "Papier colle pipe et bouteille" (Copy paste pipe and bottle) by P i ca ss o
In his catalogue essay, he seems almost offended to discover that an untitled 1932 lithograph by Gorky includes a sketch of a Picasso papier colle that was "rarely reproduced and nearly twenty years old." But FitzGerald pushes on, finding the collage reproduced in a 1928 manifesto by Andre Breton and concluding reluctantly that Gorky was interested in Surrealism as well as Cubism.
For the works in this show, reviving the technique of papier colle, Bittente has used colored wallpaper in place of his former white sheets, superimposing on it another piece of wallpaper, which has been drawn on.
A blackly brooding duo, Matisse's Goldfish and Palette, 1914, and Picasso's Harlequin, 1915 (which Matisse rightly believed his painting had inspired), share a wall, but three examples of Picasso's synthetic Cubism of 1913-14, a papier colle, painting, and assemblage, hang among them.
The ancestry of these intricate compositions must lie in Cubist papier colle, and the many images of tables and cups, favorite subjects of Murray's, could be a familial twist on Cubism's bar and cafe tables, with their bottles and glasses.
She takes for granted the familiar notion that a leveling occurs among the objects or borrowed images that find their way onto his surfaces, but then wonders why "this feat of levelling does not seem particularly odd." The question was a good one, as it calls attention to the way that previous uses of collage - in a Picasso papier colle, for example - invariably succeed in ensnaring the foreign object within a web of illusion (Steinberg's window), unlike Rauschenberg's, which remained stubbornly material and therefore uniform.