parabiosis

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par·a·bi·o·sis

 (păr′ə-bī-ō′sĭs)
n. pl. par·a·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. The natural or surgical union of anatomical parts of two organisms, usually involving exchange of blood, as in the development of conjoined twins or in certain transplant operations.
2. A temporary suspension of conductivity or excitability in a nerve.

par′a·bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.
par′a·bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parabiosis

(ˌpærəbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) the natural union of two individuals, such as Siamese twins, so that they share a common circulation of the blood
2. (Biology) a similar union induced for experimental or therapeutic purposes
[C20: from para-1 + Greek biōsis manner of life, from bios life]
parabiotic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•bi•o•sis

(ˌpær ə baɪˈoʊ sɪs, -bi-)

n.
the physiological or anatomical union of two individuals.
[1905–10]
par`a•bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

parabiosis

the uniting of two individual organisms or animals anatomically and physiologically, either under experimental or natural conditions. — parabiotic, adj.
See also: Joining
the uniting of two individual organisms or animals anatomically and physiologically, under either experimental or natural conditions. — parabiotic, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the report of Tan and Krasnow, parabiotic wild-type (WT) mice were sutured together and exchanged their circulation with "donor" ubiquitous EGFP mice for 4 months.
Human Intrauterine Parabiotic Syndro me and Its Complications.
Further investigation has been shown that adipose iNKT cells are a tissue resident with little influx from the circulation and play an important anti-inflammatory regulatory role in congenic parabiotic mice [69].
Parabiotic experiments, in which two animals share a common bloodstream, were first attempted in the 1860s, By connecting animals with different qualities or conditions, scientists can investigate how blood factors, such as cells, proteins or hormones, influence health.