parable


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par·a·ble

 (păr′ə-bəl)
n.
A simple story illustrating a moral or religious lesson.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin parabola, from Greek parabolē, from paraballein, to compare : para-, beside; see para-1 + ballein, to throw; see gwelə- in Indo-European roots.]

parable

(ˈpærəbəl)
n
1. a short story that uses familiar events to illustrate a religious or ethical point
2. (Bible) any of the stories of this kind told by Jesus Christ
[C14: from Old French parabole, from Latin parabola comparison, from Greek parabolē analogy, from paraballein to throw alongside, from para-1 + ballein to throw]
parabolist n

par•a•ble

(ˈpær ə bəl)

n.
1. a short allegorical story designed to illustrate or teach some truth, religious principle, or moral lesson.
2. a statement or comment that conveys a meaning indirectly by the use of comparison, analogy, or the like.
[1275–1325; Middle English parabil < Late Latin parabola comparison, parable, word < Greek parabolḗ comparison]

parable

A story told by Jesus to convey his religious message.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parable - a short moral story (often with animal characters)parable - a short moral story (often with animal characters)
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Aesop's fables - a collection of fables believed to have been written by the Greek storyteller Aesop
2.parable - (New Testament) any of the stories told by Jesus to convey his religious message; "the parable of the prodigal son"
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
New Testament - the collection of books of the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, the Pauline and other epistles, and Revelation; composed soon after Christ's death; the second half of the Christian Bible

parable

noun lesson, story, fable, allegory, moral tale, exemplum the parable of the Good Samaritan
Related words
adjectives parabolic, parabolical
Translations
podobenství
parabel
példázat
dæmisaga
didaktinė alegorijaparabolė
alegorijalīdzība
parabola
podobenstvo
dinî öykükıssa

parable

[ˈpærəbl] Nparábola f

parable

[ˈpærəbəl] n (= moral story) → parabole f

parable

nParabel f, → Gleichnis nt

parable

[ˈpærəbl] nparabola (Rel)

parable

(ˈpӕrəbl) noun
a story (especially in the Bible) which is intended to teach a lesson. Jesus told parables.
References in classic literature ?
The Parable is the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained in the words themselves; and which may or may not bear a special reference to the hearer, or reader.
And also this parable give I unto you: Not a few who meant to cast out their devil, went thereby into the swine themselves.
He remembered the parable of the unjust judge, and though he had previously felt sure that he ought to refuse, he now began to hesitate and, having hesitated, took to prayer and prayed until a decision formed itself in his soul.
After exhausting life in his efforts for mankind's spiritual good, he had made the manner of his death a parable, in order to impress on his admirers the mighty and mournful lesson, that, in the view of Infinite Purity, we are sinners all alike.
He thought of Cronshaw's parable of the Persian carpet.
It seems an easier and shorter way to dignity, to observe that-- since there never was a true story which could not be told in parables, where you might put a monkey for a margrave, and vice versa-- whatever has been or is to be narrated by me about low people, may be ennobled by being considered a parable; so that if any bad habits and ugly consequences are brought into view, the reader may have the relief of regarding them as not more than figuratively ungenteel, and may feel himself virtually in company with persons of some style.
The parable of Pythagoras is dark, but true; Cor ne edito; Eat not the heart.
men, and it was not for nothing that he read us this parable.
And this use of examples or images, though truly Socratic in origin, is enlarged by the genius of Plato into the form of an allegory or parable, which embodies in the concrete what has been already described, or is about to be described, in the abstract.
Hump, do you know the parable of the sower who went forth to sow?
It was in the Umpqua Valley that they heard the parable of the white sparrow.
Thus, in the parable, the Word of God is sown in all "types of soil," not just on "rich soil.