paradisal


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par·a·dise

 (păr′ə-dīs′, -dīz′)
n.
1. often Paradise The Garden of Eden.
2.
a. In various religious traditions, the Edenic or heavenly abode of righteous souls after death.
b. According to some forms of Christian belief, an intermediate resting place for righteous souls awaiting the Resurrection.
3.
a. A place of great beauty or happiness: saw the park as a paradise within a noisy city.
b. A state of delight or happiness: The newlyweds have been in paradise for months.

[Middle English paradis, from Old French, from Late Latin paradīsus, from Greek paradeisos, garden, enclosed park, paradise, from Avestan pairidaēza-, enclosure, park : pairi-, around; see per in Indo-European roots + daēza-, wall; see dheigh- in Indo-European roots.]

par′a·di·si′a·cal (-dĭ-sī′ə-kəl, -zī′-), par′a·di·si′ac (-ăk), par′a·di·sa′i·cal (-dĭ-sā′ĭ-kəl, -zā′-), par′a·di·sa′ic (-ĭk), par′a·dis′al (-dī′səl, -zəl) adj.
par′a·di·si′a·cal·ly, par′a·di·sa′i·cal·ly, par′a·dis′al·ly adv.
Word History: From an etymological perspective at least, paradise is located in ancient Iran—for it is there that the word paradise ultimately originates. The old Iranian language Avestan had a noun pairidaēza-, "a wall enclosing a garden or orchard," which is composed of pairi-, "around," and daēza- "wall." The adverb and preposition pairi is related to the equivalent Greek form peri, as in perimeter. Daēza- comes from the Indo-European root *dheigh-, "to mold, form, shape." Zoroastrian religion encouraged maintaining arbors, orchards, and gardens, and even the kings of austere Sparta were edified by seeing the Great King of Persia planting and maintaining his own trees in his own garden. Xenophon, a Greek mercenary soldier who spent some time in the Persian army and later wrote histories, recorded the pairidaēza- surrounding the orchard as paradeisos, using it not to refer to the wall itself but to the huge parks that Persian nobles loved to build and hunt in. This Greek word was used in the Septuagint translation of Genesis to refer to the Garden of Eden, and then Latin translations of the Bible used the Greek word in its Latinized form, paradisus. The Latin word was then borrowed into Old English and used to designate the Garden of Eden. In Middle English, the form of the word was influenced by its Old French equivalent, paradis, and it is from such Middle English forms as paradis that our Modern English word descends.

paradisal

(ˌpærəˈdaɪsəl) ,

paradisial

,

paradisian

,

paradisic

,

paradisical

,

paradisiac

,

paradisiacal

,

paradisaic

or

paradisaical

adj
of, relating to, or resembling paradise
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.paradisal - relating to or befitting Paradise; "together in that paradisal place"; "paradisiacal innocence"
heavenly - of or belonging to heaven or god

paradisal

adjective
References in classic literature ?
Sit I here the best of air sniffling, Paradisal air, truly, Bright and buoyant air, golden-mottled, As goodly air as ever From lunar orb downfell-- Be it by hazard, Or supervened it by arrogancy?
let me not perish now, In the budding of my Paradisal Hope
Apart from in-room luxuries including flat-screen TV, coffee and tea making facilities, and a seating area with view of the sea or the city, the 5-star hotel is also home to the capital's largest private beach, a sumptuous Moroccan Spa and an ultra-modern gym for a paradisal stay like no other.
The outside space is not intended for opulent, panoramic views of paradisal beaches, but rather taken up with a functioning vegetable garden, to Emile's delight: "Manure
But if we do not ignore the "Hail Mary" hidden in "The Dry Salvages" with all its implied "Rose-ary" context, then surely we may notice the way in which the evocations of roses throughout the Quartets are drawn together into one image at the end of the sequence: the "rose-garden" of "Burnt Norton" becomes one with the lost paradisal garden and the vision of redemption in "Little Gidding.
Made sterile by poison gas in the Iran war, lamed during the invasion of Kuwait, he finds a job in the paradisal gardens of the title.
In the Morse and Lewis stories, the (fictional) Thames Valley Police, in its uniforms and business suits, may itself seem serpent-like to the begowned collegiate inhabitants, something other, something that doesn't belong; but its purpose is to expose the serpents the gardens have inadvertently nurtured--a necessary exposure, but one that also destroys the paradisal fiction.
Today, many regard Costa Rica as a paradisal haven.
A simple example which illustrates Sumberg's claim that TPM translators are unwilling or unable to leave the 'safe haven of a straight translation' and take into consideration cross-cultural factors that will influence the performance and reception of the TT, can be found in the translation of the paradisal discourse commonly employed in tourism advertising to promote nature tourism.
If we follow the narrative of decline outlined above, then we might read these lines as a programmatic description of the fall from auratic wholeness and referential unity--from an implicitly theological, paradisal state, in Goll's terms--to a fractured, fragmented ("abgesprengt[en]") state of mechanical reproduction.
Last year, I traveled with the Anti-Nuclear Platform (NKP) to the paradisal Hamsilos Bay, ynceburun, Akliman and SarygE[micro]l.
The recumbent figure of the Sacred Heart as the Good Shepherd reposing in a lush paradisal landscape is interpreted through the perspective of three verses from the Song of Songs: 2:5, "Stay me up with flowers; compass me about with apples, because I languish with love"; 4:9, "Thou hast wounded my heart, my sister, my spouse .