paradox


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Related to paradox: Time paradox

par·a·dox

 (păr′ə-dŏks′)
n.
1. A statement that seems to contradict itself but may nonetheless be true: the paradox that standing is more tiring than walking.
2. A person, thing, or situation that exhibits inexplicable or contradictory aspects: "The silence of midnight, to speak truly, though apparently a paradox, rung in my ears" (Mary Shelley).
3. A statement that is self-contradictory or logically untenable, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises.

[Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxon, from neuter sing. of paradoxos, conflicting with expectation : para-, beyond; see para-1 + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

par′a·dox′i·cal adj.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ly adv.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ness n.

paradox

(ˈpærəˌdɒks)
n
1. a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that is or may be true: religious truths are often expressed in paradox.
2. (Logic) a self-contradictory proposition, such as I always tell lies
3. a person or thing exhibiting apparently contradictory characteristics
4. an opinion that conflicts with common belief. Also called (rare): paradoxy
[C16: from Late Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxos opposed to existing notions, from para-1 + doxa opinion]
ˌparaˈdoxical adj
ˌparaˈdoxically adv

par•a•dox

(ˈpær əˌdɒks)

n.
1. a seemingly contradictory or absurd statement that expresses a possible truth.
2. a self-contradictory and false proposition.
3. a person, thing, or situation, exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature.
4. an opinion or statement contrary to commonly accepted opinion.
[1530–40; < Latin paradoxum < Greek parádoxon, n. use of neuter of parádoxos unbelievable, literally, beyond belief. See para-1, orthodox]
par`a•dox′i•cal, adj.
par`a•dox′i•cal•ly, adv.
par`a•dox′i•cal•ness, par`a•dox`i•cal′i•ty, n.

paradox

A statement which seems to contradict itself or lead to absurdity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paradox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itselfparadox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itself; "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
contradiction in terms, contradiction - (logic) a statement that is necessarily false; "the statement `he is brave and he is not brave' is a contradiction"

paradox

noun contradiction, mystery, puzzle, ambiguity, anomaly, inconsistency, enigma, oddity, absurdity Death is a paradox, the end yet the beginning.
Translations
تَناقُض
paradox
paradoks
paradokso
paradoksi
paradoks
paradoxon
paradoks
òverstæîa, òversögn
矛盾逆説
paradoxum
paradoksasparadoksaluparadoksalus
paradokss
paradox
paradox
paradoks
paradox
ปฏิทรรศน์
парадокс

paradox

[ˈpærədɒks] Nparadoja f

paradox

[ˈpærədɒks] nparadoxe m

paradox

nParadox nt, → Paradoxon nt (liter); life/he is full of paradoxesdas Leben/er steckt voller Widersprüche

paradox

[ˈpærəˌdɒks] nparadosso

paradox

(ˈpӕrədoks) noun
a statement etc that seems to contradict itself but which is nevertheless true. If your birthday is on February 29 you could state the paradox that you are thirteen years old although you have only had three birthdays.
ˌparaˈdoxical adjective
ˌparaˈdoxically adverb
References in classic literature ?
He played with the idea and grew wilful; tossed it into the air and transformed it; let it escape and recaptured it; made it iridescent with fancy and winged it with paradox. The praise of folly, as he went on, soared into a philosophy, and philosophy herself became young, and catching the mad music of pleasure, wearing, one might fancy, her wine-stained robe and wreath of ivy, danced like a Bacchante over the hills of life, and mocked the slow Silenus for being sober.
He, who fairly burnt with immortality, denied himself immortality--such was the paradox of him.
Which sentiment being a pretty hard morsel, and bearing something of the air of a paradox, we shall leave the reader to chew the cud upon it to the end of the chapter.
Happily for me, my acquaintance among the Rosalinds of the bicycle, at this period of my life, was but slight, and thus no familiarity with the tweed knickerbocker feminine took off the edge of my delight on first beholding Nicolete clothed in like manhood with ourselves, and yet, delicious paradox! looking more like a woman than ever.
Not the world,' but the 'one wise man,' is still the paradox of Socrates in his last hours.
And he put it to us in this way--marking the points with a lean forefinger--as we sat and lazily admired his earnestness over this new paradox (as we thought it:) and his fecundity.
And there are no teachers in the higher sense of the word; that is to say, no real teachers who will arouse the spirit of enquiry in their pupils, and not merely instruct them in rhetoric or impart to them ready- made information for a fee of 'one' or of 'fifty drachms.' Plato is desirous of deepening the notion of education, and therefore he asserts the paradox that there are no educators.
I was working to get away from work, and I buckled down to it with a grim realisation of the paradox.
But notwithstanding the concurring testimony of experience, in this particular, there are still to be found visionary or designing men, who stand ready to advocate the paradox of perpetual peace between the States, though dismembered and alienated from each other.
While to Helen the paradox became clearer and clearer.
There are not wanting, it is true, some promulgators of paradoxes who maintain that there is no necessary connection between geometrical and moral Irregularity.
Their moral eccentricities, like their oddities of dress, their wild theories and paradoxes, were an entertainment which amused her, but had not the slightest influence on her convictions.