paradoxical


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par·a·dox

 (păr′ə-dŏks′)
n.
1. A statement that seems to contradict itself but may nonetheless be true: the paradox that standing is more tiring than walking.
2. A person, thing, or situation that exhibits inexplicable or contradictory aspects: "The silence of midnight, to speak truly, though apparently a paradox, rung in my ears" (Mary Shelley).
3. A statement that is self-contradictory or logically untenable, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises.

[Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxon, from neuter sing. of paradoxos, conflicting with expectation : para-, beyond; see para-1 + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

par′a·dox′i·cal adj.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ly adv.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.paradoxical - seemingly contradictory but nonetheless possibly true; "it is paradoxical that standing is more tiring than walking"
incomprehensible, inexplicable - incapable of being explained or accounted for; "inexplicable errors"; "left the house at three in the morning for inexplicable reasons"

paradoxical

adjective contradictory, inconsistent, impossible, puzzling, absurd, baffling, riddling, ambiguous, improbable, confounding, enigmatic, illogical, equivocal, oracular It seems paradoxical that some people who claim to be animal lovers still promote fox-hunting.
Translations
تناقُضي
paradoxní
paradox
òverstæîu-; mótsagnakenndur
paradoxný
çelişkiliparadoksal

paradoxical

[ˈpærəˈdɒksɪkəl] ADJparadójico

paradoxical

[ˌpærəˈdɒksɪkəl] adjparadoxal(e)

paradoxical

adjparadox; personwidersprüchlich

paradoxical

[ˌpærəˈdɒksɪkl] adjparadossale

paradox

(ˈpӕrədoks) noun
a statement etc that seems to contradict itself but which is nevertheless true. If your birthday is on February 29 you could state the paradox that you are thirteen years old although you have only had three birthdays.
ˌparaˈdoxical adjective
ˌparaˈdoxically adverb

paradoxical

adj paradójico
References in classic literature ?
"You have changed in many respects since your marriage, and for the better," said Sergey Ivanovitch, smiling to Kitty, and obviously little interested in the conversation, "but you have remained true to your passion for defending the most paradoxical theories."
It sounds paradoxical, but I am inclined to think that the weakness and insanity of the curate warned me, braced me, and kept me a sane man.
Not that he treated me to any ingenious sophistries or paradoxical perversities.
"It is a small world," he said, "especially, although it sounds paradoxical, in the big places."
How paradoxical! Yet I expect that is what we shall find in heaven."
Their very chastity, paradoxical as it may seem, is their destruction.
The Sagoths could not understand these seemingly paradoxical instructions, though their purpose was quite evident to me.
The answer which is given by Plato is paradoxical enough, and seems rather intended to stimulate than to satisfy enquiry.
The attempt to express spiritual ideas through the medium of the secular epic, with its battles and councils and all the forms of physical life, is of course rationally paradoxical. It was early pointed out that in spite of himself Milton has in some sense made Satan the hero of the poem--a reader can scarcely fail to sympathize with the fallen archangel in his unconquerable Puritan-like resistance to the arbitrary decrees of Milton's despotic Deity.
As to the opinions which are truly and wholly mine, I offer no apology for them as new, -- persuaded as I am that if their reasons be well considered they will be found to be so simple and so conformed, to common sense as to appear less extraordinary and less paradoxical than any others which can be held on the same subjects; nor do I even boast of being the earliest discoverer of any of them, but only of having adopted them, neither because they had nor because they had not been held by others, but solely because reason has convinced me of their truth.
Never in her life had she seen a man at once so paradoxical and dependable.
His next concern is to explain away the air of paradox, for James was never wilfully paradoxical. "Undeniably," he says, "'thoughts' do exist." "I mean only to deny that the word stands for an entity, but to insist most emphatically that it does stand for a function.