paradox

(redirected from paradoxicalness)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to paradoxicalness: paradoxically

par·a·dox

 (păr′ə-dŏks′)
n.
1. A statement that seems to contradict itself but may nonetheless be true: the paradox that standing is more tiring than walking.
2. A person, thing, or situation that exhibits inexplicable or contradictory aspects: "The silence of midnight, to speak truly, though apparently a paradox, rung in my ears" (Mary Shelley).
3. A statement that is self-contradictory or logically untenable, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises.

[Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxon, from neuter sing. of paradoxos, conflicting with expectation : para-, beyond; see para-1 + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

par′a·dox′i·cal adj.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ly adv.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ness n.

paradox

(ˈpærəˌdɒks)
n
1. a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that is or may be true: religious truths are often expressed in paradox.
2. (Logic) a self-contradictory proposition, such as I always tell lies
3. a person or thing exhibiting apparently contradictory characteristics
4. an opinion that conflicts with common belief. Also called (rare): paradoxy
[C16: from Late Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxos opposed to existing notions, from para-1 + doxa opinion]
ˌparaˈdoxical adj
ˌparaˈdoxically adv

par•a•dox

(ˈpær əˌdɒks)

n.
1. a seemingly contradictory or absurd statement that expresses a possible truth.
2. a self-contradictory and false proposition.
3. a person, thing, or situation, exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature.
4. an opinion or statement contrary to commonly accepted opinion.
[1530–40; < Latin paradoxum < Greek parádoxon, n. use of neuter of parádoxos unbelievable, literally, beyond belief. See para-1, orthodox]
par`a•dox′i•cal, adj.
par`a•dox′i•cal•ly, adv.
par`a•dox′i•cal•ness, par`a•dox`i•cal′i•ty, n.

paradox

A statement which seems to contradict itself or lead to absurdity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paradox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itselfparadox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itself; "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
contradiction in terms, contradiction - (logic) a statement that is necessarily false; "the statement `he is brave and he is not brave' is a contradiction"

paradox

noun contradiction, mystery, puzzle, ambiguity, anomaly, inconsistency, enigma, oddity, absurdity Death is a paradox, the end yet the beginning.
Translations
تَناقُض
paradox
paradoks
paradokso
paradoksi
paradoks
paradoxon
paradoks
òverstæîa, òversögn
矛盾逆説
paradoxum
paradoksasparadoksaluparadoksalus
paradokss
paradox
paradox
paradoks
paradox
ปฏิทรรศน์
парадокс

paradox

[ˈpærədɒks] Nparadoja f

paradox

[ˈpærədɒks] nparadoxe m

paradox

nParadox nt, → Paradoxon nt (liter); life/he is full of paradoxesdas Leben/er steckt voller Widersprüche

paradox

[ˈpærəˌdɒks] nparadosso

paradox

(ˈpӕrədoks) noun
a statement etc that seems to contradict itself but which is nevertheless true. If your birthday is on February 29 you could state the paradox that you are thirteen years old although you have only had three birthdays.
ˌparaˈdoxical adjective
ˌparaˈdoxically adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
1]) the extreme paradoxicalness of this problem, namely, the appearance of the acausal loops, when the cyclic process terminates at the point of its beginning, but before its beginning, is discussed.
Toward the beginning of this essay, I suggested that there are two rather obvious strategies for attempting to mitigate the problem of Aristotle's nous poietikos, that is, the paradoxicalness of the conclusion of this argument.
In "Deniall"--a study in the paradoxicalness of object relations--a self disintegrating in the rejection by and loss of its other manages to pull itself from the verge of dissipation by focusing on--remembering--the significant inclusion of the self's half of a harmonious rhyme.