parallax


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par·al·lax

 (păr′ə-lăks′)
n.
A change in the apparent position of an object relative to more distant objects, caused by a change in the observer's line of sight toward the object.

[French parallaxe, from Greek parallaxis, from parallassein, to change : para-, among; see para-1 + allassein, to exchange (from allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots).]

par′al·lac′tic (-lăk′tĭk) adj.

parallax

(ˈpærəˌlæks)
n
1. (General Physics) an apparent change in the position of an object resulting from a change in position of the observer
2. (Astronomy) astronomy the angle subtended at a celestial body, esp a star, by the radius of the earth's orbit. Annual or heliocentric parallax is the apparent displacement of a nearby star resulting from its observation from the earth. Diurnal or geocentric parallax results from the observation of a planet, the sun, or the moon from the surface of the earth
[C17: via French from New Latin parallaxis, from Greek: change, from parallassein to change, from para-1 + allassein to alter]
parallactic adj
ˌparalˈlactically adv

par•al•lax

(ˈpær əˌlæks)

n.
1. the apparent displacement of an observed object due to a change in the position of the observer.
2. the apparent angular displacement of a celestial body due to its being observed from the surface instead of from the center of the earth or due to its being observed from the earth instead of from the sun.
3. the difference between the view of an object as seen through the picture-taking lens of a camera and the view as seen through a separate viewfinder.
[1585–95; < Greek parállaxis change =parallak- (s. of parallássein to cause to alternate =para- para-1 + allássein to vary, akin to állos other) + -sis -sis]
par`al•lac′tic (-ˈlæk tɪk) adj.
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parallax
Viewed from point A, a nearby star appears to occupy position a against a background of more distant stars. Six months later, from position B, the star appears to occupy position b.

par·al·lax

(păr′ə-lăks′)
An apparent change in the position of an object, such as a star, caused by a change in the observer's position that provides a new line of sight. The parallax of nearby stars caused by observing them from opposite points in Earth's orbit around the sun is used in estimating the stars' distance from Earth.

parallax

In photography, the apparent displacement of the position of an object in relation to a reference point, due to a change in the point of observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parallax - the apparent displacement of an object as seen from two different points that are not on a line with the objectparallax - the apparent displacement of an object as seen from two different points that are not on a line with the object
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
annual parallax, heliocentric parallax - the parallax of a celestial body using two points in the earth's orbit around the sun as the baseline
diurnal parallax, geocentric parallax - the parallax of a celestial body using two points on the surface of the earth as the earth rotates
Translations

parallax

[ˈpærəlæks] nparallaxe f

parallax

nParallaxe f

par·al·lax

n. paralaje, posición de desplazamiento aparente de un objeto de acuerdo con la posición del observador.
References in classic literature ?
They took advantage of this fact to explain to them that this distance was obtained by measuring the parallax of the moon.
He brought our Saviour to the western side Of that high mountain, whence he might behold Another plain, long, but in breadth not wide, Washed by the southern sea, and on the north To equal length backed with a ridge of hills That screened the fruits of the earth and seats of men From cold Septentrion blasts; thence in the midst Divided by a river, off whose banks On each side an Imperial City stood, With towers and temples proudly elevate On seven small hills, with palaces adorned, Porches and theatres, baths, aqueducts, Statues and trophies, and triumphal arcs, Gardens and groves, presented to his eyes Above the highth of mountains interposed-- By what strange parallax, or optic skill Of vision, multiplied through air, or glass Of telescope, were curious to enquire.
What is the nature and power of that science- baffling star, without parallax, without calculable elements, which shoots a ray of beauty even into trivial and impure actions, if the least mark of independence appear?
After measuring the parallax angle between the two transit lines, we'd use the distance between West Richland and Haleakala to calculate the distance to Venus and thus the a.u.
By analyzing 3D image warping, the perceived depth is expressed as a function of three adjustable parameters: virtual view number, scale factor and depth value of ZPS (zero parallax setting).
"The reader of 'Parallax: True Crime Tales' will be taken into a world of crime, tragedy, terror, courage, and triumph in these true-to-life tales," said Lance LoRusso, author of "Parallax: True Crime Tales." "While these stories may sound like something out of a Hollywood blockbuster, they are truly inspired by my experiences on the force and the realities law enforcement officers confront daily."
The illumination dial is positioned outside the parallax dial, but there were no issues with the parallax moving when adjusting the illumination.
Parallax occurs when the target and reticle are not in the same focal plane.
Our collaboration with Parallax, founded by world-renowned experts in pulmonary research and technology, is another step forward and will give us access to innovative technologies and expertise.'
In the pickup part, the 3D information is acquired firstly by using a SAII system, and M x N parallax images which record different perspectives of 3D scene can be obtained.
Fox Technologies, a Parallax Capital Partners portfolio company, helps organisations centralise Linux and Unix access management for cloud, on-premise, or hybrid IT environments.