parallax

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Related to parallaxes: stellar parallax

par·al·lax

 (păr′ə-lăks′)
n.
A change in the apparent position of an object relative to more distant objects, caused by a change in the observer's line of sight toward the object.

[French parallaxe, from Greek parallaxis, from parallassein, to change : para-, among; see para-1 + allassein, to exchange (from allos, other; see al- in Indo-European roots).]

par′al·lac′tic (-lăk′tĭk) adj.

parallax

(ˈpærəˌlæks)
n
1. (General Physics) an apparent change in the position of an object resulting from a change in position of the observer
2. (Astronomy) astronomy the angle subtended at a celestial body, esp a star, by the radius of the earth's orbit. Annual or heliocentric parallax is the apparent displacement of a nearby star resulting from its observation from the earth. Diurnal or geocentric parallax results from the observation of a planet, the sun, or the moon from the surface of the earth
[C17: via French from New Latin parallaxis, from Greek: change, from parallassein to change, from para-1 + allassein to alter]
parallactic adj
ˌparalˈlactically adv

par•al•lax

(ˈpær əˌlæks)

n.
1. the apparent displacement of an observed object due to a change in the position of the observer.
2. the apparent angular displacement of a celestial body due to its being observed from the surface instead of from the center of the earth or due to its being observed from the earth instead of from the sun.
3. the difference between the view of an object as seen through the picture-taking lens of a camera and the view as seen through a separate viewfinder.
[1585–95; < Greek parállaxis change =parallak- (s. of parallássein to cause to alternate =para- para-1 + allássein to vary, akin to állos other) + -sis -sis]
par`al•lac′tic (-ˈlæk tɪk) adj.
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parallax
Viewed from point A, a nearby star appears to occupy position a against a background of more distant stars. Six months later, from position B, the star appears to occupy position b.

par·al·lax

(păr′ə-lăks′)
An apparent change in the position of an object, such as a star, caused by a change in the observer's position that provides a new line of sight. The parallax of nearby stars caused by observing them from opposite points in Earth's orbit around the sun is used in estimating the stars' distance from Earth.

parallax

In photography, the apparent displacement of the position of an object in relation to a reference point, due to a change in the point of observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parallax - the apparent displacement of an object as seen from two different points that are not on a line with the objectparallax - the apparent displacement of an object as seen from two different points that are not on a line with the object
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
annual parallax, heliocentric parallax - the parallax of a celestial body using two points in the earth's orbit around the sun as the baseline
diurnal parallax, geocentric parallax - the parallax of a celestial body using two points on the surface of the earth as the earth rotates
Translations

parallax

[ˈpærəlæks] nparallaxe f

parallax

nParallaxe f

par·al·lax

n. paralaje, posición de desplazamiento aparente de un objeto de acuerdo con la posición del observador.
References in periodicals archive ?
Integral imaging (II) is considered as one of the attractive three-dimensional (3D) technologies since it can provide both horizontal and vertical parallaxes and quasi-continuous viewing angles [1-4].
10) will measure the parallaxes of only 1% of the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy.
After adding the time delay model, the left and right parallaxes that are put into left-right consistency check model will be in synchronous alignment.
In this article it is shown how the improvement in the accuracy of star position measurements over the past 400 years led first to the discovery of 'Proper Motions'--the individual movements of the stars--and afterwards to 'Parallaxes' or the measurement of their distances by trigonometry.
The trendlines of maximum and minimum horizontal sensor parallaxes reached when adjusting the three parameters respectively are plotted based on the image data of frame 0 from "Breakdance" sequences [16].
The strength and prevalence of social parallaxes suggest that it is an example of the type of dynamic concept we need.
Parallaxes grow smaller as objects grow more distant, and the Moon is the only object close enough to give a measurable parallax to the unaided eye.
He rates its capabilities as "orders of magnitude improvement over what's foreseeable in the next few years.' It would be capable of measuring parallaxes of objects at kiloparsec distances with 10 percent accuracy.
But this measured result is not just the parallax of Venus; it's the combined parallaxes of Venus and the Sun.
Our pictures show a parallax of 3.3 moon-diameters between Pretoria/Johannesburg and Edmonton/Calgary, which is one of the largest parallaxes (perhaps even the largest parallax) ever recorded from the Earth's surface.
The parallaxes of all other heavenly bodies were far too small to measure with the unaided eye, and the telescopes weren't quite good enough to do the job.
By 1913-14, astronomers had greatly improved methods of taking simultaneous spectra of many stars by using big prisms and of finding distances to stars by observing their parallaxes. All this information enabled astronomers to link the stars' distances with their apparent brightnesses to calculate their intrinsic brightnesses, and also measure their surface temperatures (or, at least, their spectral types).