paralogism

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pa·ral·o·gism

 (pə-răl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
A fallacious or illogical argument or conclusion.

[Late Latin paralogismus, from Greek paralogismos, from paralogos, unreasonable : para-, beyond; see para-1 + logos, reason; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·ral′o·gist n.
pa·ral′o·gis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

paralogism

(pəˈræləˌdʒɪzəm)
n
1. (Logic) logic psychol an argument that is unintentionally invalid. Compare sophism
2. (Psychology) logic psychol an argument that is unintentionally invalid. Compare sophism
3. any invalid argument or conclusion
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek paralogismos, from paralogizesthai to argue fallaciously, from para-1 + -logizesthai, ultimately from logos word]
paˈralogist n
paˌraloˈgistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paralogism, paralogy, paralogia

a method or process of reasoning which contradicts logical rules or formulas, especially the use of a faulty syllogism (the formal fallacy). — paralogist, n. — paralogistic, adj.
See also: Argumentation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paralogism - an unintentionally invalid argument
fallacy, false belief - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Other two-parameter distributions were fitted to the data set, which have not been included in Table 5, such as the inverse Gaussian, Lomax, paralogistic, Gumbel and generalized exponential (see Gupta and Kundu [12]).
When in the nineteenth century Gustav Fechner (1801-87) articulates the idea of a pyscho-physics free of paralogistic metaphysical and theological ballast, he is only bringing this unifying commitment to the fore.