parapet


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Related to parapet: parapet wall

par·a·pet

 (păr′ə-pĭt, -pĕt′)
n.
1. A low protective wall or railing along the edge of a raised structure such as a roof or balcony.
2. An earthen or stone embankment protecting soldiers from enemy fire. See Synonyms at bulwark.

[French, from Italian parapetto : parare, to shield; see parasol + petto, chest (from Latin pectus).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parapet

(ˈpærəpɪt; -ˌpɛt)
n
1. (Architecture) a low wall or railing along the edge of a balcony, roof, etc
2. (Fortifications) Also called: breastwork a rampart, mound of sandbags, bank, etc, in front of a trench, giving protection from fire from the front
[C16: from Italian parapetto, literally: chest-high wall, from para-2 + petto, from Latin pectus breast]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•pet

(ˈpær ə pɪt, -ˌpɛt)

n.
1. a wall or elevation in a fortification, esp. one at the outer edge of a rampart.
2. any low protective wall or barrier at the edge of a balcony, roof, bridge, or the like.
[1575–85; < Italian parapetto=para- para-2 + petto chest, breast < Latin pectus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parapet - a low wall along the edge of a roof or balconyparapet - a low wall along the edge of a roof or balcony
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
2.parapet - fortification consisting of a low wallparapet - fortification consisting of a low wall
fortification, munition - defensive structure consisting of walls or mounds built around a stronghold to strengthen it
machicolation - a projecting parapet supported by corbels on a medieval castle; has openings through which stones or boiling water could be dropped on an enemy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

parapet

noun
1. balustrade, wall, railing He climbed up on to the parapet of the bridge and sat dangling his legs.
2. battlements, defence, barricade, rampart, fortification, bulwark, breastwork, castellation The soldiers crouched behind the parapet.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
حاجِز الجِسْر او الشُّرْفه
parapet
rækværk
GeländerParapet
mellvéd
brjóstriî
parapetas
parapets, aizsargmargas
korkuluk duvarı

parapet

[ˈpærəpɪt] N [of balcony, roof] → pretil m, antepecho m; [of fortification] → parapeto m
to put one's head above the parapet (Brit) → arriesgar el cuello
to keep one's head below the parapet (Brit) → mantenerse al margen
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

parapet

[ˈpærəpɪt] nparapet m
to put one's head above the parapet (British)se mouiller
to keep one's head below the parapet → ne pas se mouiller
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

parapet

n (on rampart, of bridge) → Brüstung f; (of well)(Brunnen)wand f; to put one’s head above the parapet (fig)sich in die Schusslinie begeben; to keep one’s head below the parapet (fig)sich bedeckt halten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

parapet

[ˈpærəpɪt] nparapetto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

parapet

(ˈpӕrəpit) noun
a low wall along the edge of a bridge, balcony etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
I turned to take the road back, and stopped, struck by the tranquil beauty of the last faint light in the western sky, shining behind the black line formed by the parapet of the bridge.
"Clear that away!" said the officer, pointing to the beams and the corpses, and the French soldiers, after dispatching the wounded, threw the corpses over the parapet.
He planted a board, which he had carried up with him for the purpose, so firmly against the door that it must be matter of great difficulty to open it from the inside; and creeping over the tiles, looked over the low parapet.
She stopped and leant her elbows against the parapet of the embankment.
Instead of going into the drawing room, where he heard voices, he stopped on the terrace, and leaning his elbows on the parapet, he gazed up at the sky.
Porthos and Aramis, mute and trembling at the top of the parapet, cried to the musketeer, "Good D'Artagnan, take care!"
He turned away from me and leaned over the parapet of the bridge.
Bounderby's humility to keep Nickits's roses on a reduced scale - and Tom sat down on a terrace-parapet, plucking buds and picking them to pieces; while his powerful Familiar stood over him, with a foot upon the parapet, and his figure easily resting on the arm supported by that knee.
Once on the roof of the tavern, it has been proved, by experiment, that a man might cut through the trap-door, while lying down on it, and that in such a position, the parapet in front of the house would conceal him from the view of anyone passing in the street.
At first they sought to discover his location in No Man's Land; but when an officer looking over the parapet through a periscope was struck full in the back of the head with a rifle bullet which passed through his skull and fell to the bottom of the trench they realized that it was beyond the parados rather than the parapet that they should search.
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
He had a vast coil of cord efficient for the purpose, which worked on a roller fixed on the parapet of the tower.