paraphrasable


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Related to paraphrasable: paraphrasis

par·a·phrase

 (păr′ə-frāz′)
n.
1. A restatement of a text or passage in another form or other words, often to clarify meaning.
2. The restatement of texts in other words as a studying or teaching device.
3. The adaptation or alteration of a text or quotation to serve a different purpose from that of the original.
v. par·a·phrased, par·a·phras·ing, par·a·phras·es
v.tr.
1. To restate using different words, especially to clarify.
2. To adapt or alter (a text or quotation) to serve a different purpose from that of the original: "It's tempting to paraphrase an environmental slogan and say, 'Think globally, pray locally'" (Christian Science Monitor).
v.intr.
To compose a paraphrase.

[French, from Latin paraphrasis, from Greek, from paraphrazein, to paraphrase : para-, alongside; see para-1 + phrazein, to show, explain; see gwhren- in Indo-European roots.]

par′a·phras′a·ble adj.
par′a·phras′er n.

paraphrasable

(ˈpærəˌfreɪzəbəl)
adj
capable of being paraphrased
References in periodicals archive ?
Through this choice, Baroni has given himself a task as difficult as possible: if one adheres to the popular sense of plot as synonymous with fabula, only Derborence can be said to have a summarizable, paraphrasable plot.
of options for encoding the paraphrasable content of a writing."
For too many of us the default setting is to think and say that the mass consisting of formal patterns is the shadow and servant of the mass consisting of the paraphrasable gist.
What is being protected is more than a secret human love affair; it is also a love affair with language, with a poetic process that is unwilling to reduce poems to paraphrasable meanings and simultaneously to consumable products.
Readers who take comfort in paraphrasable sense may prefer part 2, but those more drawn to experiment will find the daring, imaginative flights more appealing.
The result is that the fact of verse seems insisted on with a blinding purity, stripped to the maximum degree possible of any superstitious analogy whatever with the paraphrasable content (which does not need paraphrase).
Since I'm a viewer with a bias toward finding paraphrasable meaning, this puts me in a position that reminds me of that of the suitor in a famous passage from Sartre's Being and Nothingness, As you may recall, the fellow doesn't know whether the girl means to accept or resist his advances--and neither does she.
But writers like David Lodge (1966:19) and Bassnett (1980) argued convincingly, that novels are non paraphrasable.
The names were not merely paraphrasable positions; they also contained implicit arguments.