parasiticide


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par·a·sit·i·cide

 (păr′ə-sĭt′ĭ-sīd′)
n.
An agent or preparation used to destroy parasites.

par′a·sit′i·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

parasiticide

(ˌpærəˈsɪtɪˌsaɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any substance capable of destroying parasites
adj
(Biology) destructive to parasites
ˌparaˌsitiˈcidal adj

par•a•sit•i•cide

(ˌpær əˈsɪt əˌsaɪd)

n.
1. a substance that destroys parasites.
adj.
2. destructive to parasites.
par`a•sit`i•cid′al, adj.
Translations

par·a·sit·i·cide

n. parasiticida, agente destructor de parásitos.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Endo products against internal parasites, such as worms, represent about 20% of the Companion Animal parasiticide market,' says Christoph Vetten, Head of Greater China for Bayer Animal Health.
Ex-Virbac sales of Iverhart, antibiotic and dental ranges also continue to show very significant growth, offsetting the decline in sales of external parasiticide ranges.
Cost, ease and frequency of application, lifestyle, and the parasiticide's spectrum are important considerations.
The great news is there are parasiticide treatments that can kill ticks.
It is claimed to be antiseptic, antispasmodic, antidiarrhoeal, antimicrobial, anti-emetic, anti-putrescent, anti-oxidant, astringent, carminative, digestive, aphrodisiac, parasiticide, cardiac and a respiratory stimulant, an antidote for poisons and a vermifuge.
salina toxicity with other biological activities like antimicrobial, parasiticide, virucide, and molluscicidal activities (Arcanjo et al., 2012).
Thiabendazole ((1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-1,3-thiazole) is a pesticide belongs to the benzimidazole group which acts mainly as fungicide but also as parasiticide in different crops.
Costa, "Evaluation of parasiticide treatment with benznidazol in the electrocardiographic, clinical, and serological evolution of Chagas disease," PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol.
In some of these studies, emphasize their application as an insecticide and parasiticide, [4], [5], [6].
magna was more sensible to ethanol exposure than to florfenicol antibiotic (no mortality on 100 mg [L.sup.-1] exposure) and less sensible to a toltrazuril parasiticide (100% mortality on 50 mg [L.sup.-1] exposure) (Florencio et al., 2014).
This has produced somewhat draconian proposals, including that the horns of living rhinos be sprayed with a parasiticide that is toxic to humans.