parasitism


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Related to parasitism: symbiosis, Brood parasitism

par·a·sit·ism

 (păr′ə-sĭ-tĭz′əm, -sī-)
n.
1. A relationship between two organisms of different species in which one is a parasite and the other is a host.
2. The characteristic behavior or mode of existence of a parasite or parasitic population.
3. Parasitosis.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parasitism

(ˈpærəsaɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Biology) the relationship between a parasite and its host
2. (Pathology) the state of being infested with parasites
3. the state of being a parasite
4. (Biology) the state of being a parasite
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•sit•ism

(ˈpær ə saɪˌtɪz əm, -sɪ-)

n.
1. a relation between organisms in which one lives as a parasite on another.
2. a parasitic mode of existence.
3. a diseased condition due to parasites.
[1605–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

par·a·sit·ism

(păr′ə-sĭ-tĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one organism benefits and the other is generally harmed. See Note at symbiosis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parasitism

a relationship between animals in which one gains sustenance from the other. Cf. commensalism. See also biology; plants.
See also: Animals
a relationship between plants in which one gains sustenance from the other. See also animals; biology.
See also: Plants
the living together of two organisms in a relationship that is beneficial to one and destructive to the other. — parasitic, parasitical, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parasitism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms in which one receives benefits from the other by causing damage to it (usually not fatal damage)
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

parasitism

[ˈpærəsɪtɪzəm] Nparasitismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

parasitism

[ˈpærəsaɪˌtɪzm] nparassitismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

par·a·si·tism

n. parasitismo, infección de parásitos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
In no country in the world did parasitism ever take on so pleasant a form.
This little community had returned from its original habits of suburban parasitism to what no doubt had been the normal life of humanity for nearly immemorial years, a life of homely economies in the most intimate, contact with cows and hens and patches of around, a life that breathes and exhales the scent of cows and finds the need for stimulants satisfied by the activity of the bacteria and vermin it engenders.
This study was conducted to investigate the seasonal abundance and feeding habits of stink bug species in mimosa, and to provide estimates of parasitism of naturally occurring stink bug eggs on this tree.
A melon-headed whale (Peponecephala electra) died of starvation and parasitism two days after it was washed ashore at the Cancabato Bay in this city.
A survey of whitefly populations and its parasitism with connection to temperature and relative humidity was conducted in fourteen cotton growing districts of Sindh province (southern Pakistan) for 2012 and 2013 seasons.
DOH has a two-pronged approach to fight parasitism, Baton said.
Any species that provides protection or care to its young is susceptible to brood parasitism, but conditions that drive the evolution of brood parasitism seem to be narrow [13-16].
Usually, freshly deposited eggs are preferred because old eggs adversely affect the parasitism rate of parasitoid (Rocha, Kolberg, Mendonca Jr., & Redaelli, 2006).
Concerning the evolution of the parasite incidence and the overall parasitism rate, the rate of parasitism on the Washington navel variety compared to the overall population is 23% and it is 32% relative to the potential host population.