parataxis

(redirected from parataxes)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to parataxes: hypotaxis

par·a·tax·is

 (păr′ə-tăk′sĭs)
n.
The juxtaposition of clauses or phrases without the use of coordinating or subordinating conjunctions, as It was cold; the snows came.

[Greek, a placing side by side, from paratassein, to arrange side by side : para-, beside; see para-1 + tassein, tag-, to arrange.]

par′a·tac′tic (-tăk′tĭk), par′a·tac′ti·cal (-tĭ-kəl) adj.
par′a·tac′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parataxis

(ˌpærəˈtæksɪs)
n
(Grammar) the juxtaposition of clauses in a sentence without the use of a conjunction, as for example None of my friends stayed — they all left early
[C19: New Latin from Greek, from paratassein, literally: to arrange side by side, from para-1 + tassein to arrange]
paratactic, paratactical adj
ˌparaˈtactically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•tax•is

(ˌpær əˈtæk sɪs)

n.
the placing together of sentences, clauses, or phrases without using conjunctive words, as Hurry up, it's getting late. Compare hypotaxis.
[1835–45; < New Latin < Greek parátaxis an arranging in order for battle. See para-1, -taxis]
par`a•tac′tic (-ˈtæk tɪk) par`a•tac′ti•cal, adj.
par`a•tac′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

parataxis

arrangement of thoughts as coordinate units in grammatical construction. Cf. hypotaxis.paratactic, adj.
See also: Grammar
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

parataxis

[ˌpærəˈtæksɪs] Nparataxis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Tractatus and the Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein explores the 'mystery' of language - and encourages the reader to undertake the same exploration - through a series of gnomic statements and questions which defy simple categorization (and the contemporary language of philosophy at Wittgenstein's Cambridge) and display instead what Perloff calls 'an imaginative deployment of exempla, apposite images, parataxes, and sudden leaps of faith'.
Eleven sections - running from the more cohesive contemplations of "Vue sur le lac," "Les pivoines," and "Eaux de la Sauve, eaux du Lez" to the more fragile compactions of "Notes nocturnes," the many parataxes of proses such as "Au col de Larche," the oddly serene ruffledness of the closing verse of "Apres beau-coup d'annees" - spell out, ever patiently, though often interrogatively, the delicate intricacies of Jaccottet's much-meditated poetics.