parent cell


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Related to parent cell: daughter cells

parent cell

n.
2. A cell, such as a stem cell or progenitor cell, that is the precursor or source of other cells.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cascades are iterative manipulations of [n.sub.g] cells over g generations that may redistribute the proportion [p.sub.i,j] contained in each ith parent cell in generation j (for j < g, i < [n.sub.j]) across some number of daughter cells in generation j + 1 each containing [p.sub.k,j+1], for 1 [less than or equal to] k [less than or equal to] [n.sub.j+1].
These are the first human cells that are known to be capable of cell division with just one copy of the parent cell's genome.
Mitosis and cytokinesis together define the mitotic (M) phase of an animal cell cycle--the division of the mother cell into two daughter cells, genetically identical to each other and to their parent cell. The process of mitosis is highly complex.
the mother cell divides into two daughter cells, genetically identical to each other and to their parent cell. The process of mitosis is fast and highly complex.
One of the cells is destined for lineage progression while the other attains the characteristics of parent cell. Studies in yeast C.
Briefly, 5(6)-carbosyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labeled PBMCs are incubated with stimulants for four to five days at 37oC/5% CO2 and determine the number of fluorescent peaks corresponding to cell divisions of the parent cell population (Figure 2).
The location in the DNA where a transposon moves acts as an individual cell's barcode, so that if the mouse's blood is taken a few months later, any cells with the same transposon location can be linked back to its parent cell.
We don't get a perfect, new cell with mitotic cell division--we get a duplicate of the parent cell with the same DNA damage and epigenetic markers.
These cells have been derived from a single parent cell.[6] When examined by electron microscopy, the cells contain multilamellar cytoplasmic inclusion bodies typical of those found in type II alveolar epithelial cells of the lung.
A cell and its sister are formed when their parent cell divides in two.