parentalism


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parentalism

1. the behavior of a parent.
2. the assumption by a nonparent of superior authority over a child; paternalism.
See also: Parents
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154) Parentalism is concerned with protecting the right of parents to immerse their children in their own values, even when those values conflict with the majority's.
Beneficence, justice, and parentalism are examples of some of these values (Fine & Kurdek, 2003).
preference for limiting parentalism as much as possible and perhaps the
Fairfield, Protecting Virtual Playrounds: Children, Law, and Play Online: Virtual Parentalism, 66 WASH.
87) This category is rightly vulnerable to criticisms of parentalism.
This is intensely so in the world of the clinic, where the patient's role is a reality that may disrupt certain therapeutic relationships (and where transference in both directions is going on between the bright young things that have become doctors and the patients who are constantly tempted to project parentalism on them).
Cook and Dickens have stated that parental over-protectiveness can hinder adolescent development, mentioning also that, "in requiring legal respect for adolescents' evolving capacities, the Children's Convention sets legal limits to inappropriate, obstructive and dysfunctional parentalism.
In addition, parentalism is often extended to non-family employees, promoting a sense of stability and commitment to the firm among all employees.
According to that immensely influential study, "American history consummates the disappearance of the wider [or extended] familism and the substitution of the parentalism of society.
These contributions are merely "possibility theorems," but they have deepened our understanding of both externalities and parentalism as grounds for limiting contractual freedom.
Thus, out of parentalism (the gender-neutral version of "paternalism"), people endorse the general prohibition of the behavior, even in those who benefit from it.
Professor Stephen Gillers, in describing what he calls "liberal parentalism," states that parental control over a child's education is "presumed superior" because "the fallible human agents through whom government must act are less likely to do what is good for other people's children than fallible individual parents are to do what is good for their own.