parentalism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

parentalism

1. the behavior of a parent.
2. the assumption by a nonparent of superior authority over a child; paternalism.
See also: Parents
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
James Buchanan (2005) called "parentalism" the desire of people to be taken care of by the state, like children by their parents, and he forecasted that this phenomenon would continue to fuel socialism in the twenty-first century.
They want to be guaranteed "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being." James Buchanan, the 1986 Nobel economics laureate, calls "parentalism" this desire of the people to be taken care of like children by the state.
(154) Parentalism is concerned with protecting the right of parents to immerse their children in their own values, even when those values conflict with the majority's.
parentalism, (115) but requiring less risks an unjust outcome.
Hence, the "farewell to maternalism" appears to be part and parcel of a broader "farewell to parentalism", the higher care involvement of many fathers notwithstanding.
Fairfield, Protecting Virtual Playrounds: Children, Law, and Play Online: Virtual Parentalism, 66 WASH.
(74) We use the term "parentalism" rather than "paternalism" because the former supposes an incapacity on the part of those being directed to their own good.
(87) This category is rightly vulnerable to criticisms of parentalism. Because of the bilateral nature of the arrangements, it is relatively cheap to alter the terms of the deal.
Think of "paternalism" and its benign cousin "parentalism," and note how parental care and medical care have at least "care" in common.
This is intensely so in the world of the clinic, where the patient's role is a reality that may disrupt certain therapeutic relationships (and where transference in both directions is going on between the bright young things that have become doctors and the patients who are constantly tempted to project parentalism on them).
Cook and Dickens have stated that parental over-protectiveness can hinder adolescent development, mentioning also that, "in requiring legal respect for adolescents' evolving capacities, the Children's Convention sets legal limits to inappropriate, obstructive and dysfunctional parentalism." (7)
Fine and Kurdek (1993) addressed three ethical principles that may provide guidance when the ethics codes themselves appear inadequate: beneficence, justice, and parentalism. Beneficence is helping others promote their important and legitimate interests and abstaining from injuring others, mainly by preventing or removing potential harm.