parergon

(redirected from parerga)

parergon

(pəˈrɛəɡɒn)
n, pl -ga (-ɡə)
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) work that is not one's main employment
[C17: from Latin, from Greek, from para-1 + ergon work]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
In conduct these ends had been attained; but the difficulty of making his Key to all Mythologies unimpeachable weighed like lead upon his mind; and the pamphlets--or "Parerga" as he called them--by which he tested his public and deposited small monumental records of his march, were far from having been seen in all their significance.
Despite a dense and diverse critical framework (moving from historical notions of the sublime from Longinus to Kant, to Kantian and Derridean parerga and differance, Heideggerian openness, the Deleuzian fold, Piercian semiotics, and Genettian narrative theory), Minor's exploration of the problematic relationship between interior/exterior, body/drapery, sculpture/architecture, textual/visual is surprisingly readable and full of verve (Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza appears to "corkscrew itself into the Heavens").
In Pieter Gillis' own letter to the statesman Jerome Busleyden, which was also included amongst the parerga of the book's first edition, he praised "the accuracy of his [More's] memory" (felicissimae memoriae fidem) (127) and reassured his correspondent that there is no need to accumulate arguments to render the account more credible (argumentis astruere fidem), for the pure and simple reason that More himself could vouch for it (Morus ille sit autor) (128).
From OUP: "The Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh offers the first scholarly edition of Waugh's work, bringing together all of his extant writings and graphic art: novels, biographies, travel writing, short fiction, essays, articles, reportage, reviews, poems, juvenilia, parerga, drawings, and designs.
In 1851 he published Parerga and Paralipomena (9), which means 'complementary works and matters omitted'.
He continues: "For he [God] is the Creator not of the world only, but of possibility itself; and, therefore, he ought to have so ordered possibility as that it would admit of something better." Arthur Schopenhauer, "On the Sufferings of the World," in Parerga and Paralipomena: A Collection of Philosophical Essays, trans.