parishioner


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pa·rish·ion·er

 (pə-rĭsh′ə-nər)
n.
A member of a parish.

[Middle English, from parishon, parishioner, from Old French parochien, from parroche, parish; see parish.]

parishioner

(pəˈrɪʃənə)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a member of a particular parish
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a member of a particular parish

pa•rish•ion•er

(pəˈrɪʃ ə nər)

n.
one of the members or inhabitants of a parish.
[1425–75; late Middle English; earlier parishion, Middle English paroschian, -ien, -en < Old French paroissien. See parish, -ian, -er1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parishioner - a member of a parishparishioner - a member of a parish      
parish - a local church community
church member, churchgoer - a religious person who goes to church regularly
Translations

parishioner

[pəˈrɪʃənəʳ] Nfeligrés/esa m/f

parishioner

[pəˈrɪʃər] nparoissien(ne) m/fparish magazine nmagazine m paroissialparish priest n (Catholic)curé m; (Protestant)pasteur mparish records nregistres mpl paroissiaux

parishioner

nGemeinde(mit)glied nt

parishioner

[pəˈrɪʃənəʳ] nparrocchiano/a
References in classic literature ?
He entered with an almost noiseless step, bent his head mildly to the pews on each side, and bowed as he passed his oldest parishioner, a white-haired great grandsire, who occupied an arm-chair in the centre of the aisle.
The vicar of their pleasant rural parish was not a controversialist, but a good hand at whist, and one who had a joke always ready for a blooming female parishioner. The religion of the Dodsons consisted in revering whatever was customary and respectable; it was necessary to be baptized, else one could not be buried in the church-yard, and to take the sacrament before death, as a security against more dimly understood perils; but it was of equal necessity to have the proper pall-bearers and well-cured hams at one's funeral, and to leave an unimpeachable will.
But, my good friend, what will you do then with your fellow- parishioner who opposes your husband in the vestry?
After all, he knew nothing about them, and pension joys, pension sorrows, are flimsy things; whereas Lucy would be his parishioner.
There's a parishioner of mine-- a fine fellow, but who would hardly have pulled through as he has done without his wife.
"You're about, I hear, to marry the daughter of my parishioner and son in the spirit, Prince Shtcherbatsky?" he resumed, with a smile.
Higginson enumerates, among the many felicities of his distinguished parishioner's earthly career, the happy seasonableness of his death.
Chaloner, the rector's wife, was among the earliest customers at the shop, thinking it only right to encourage a new parishioner who had made a decorous appearance at church; and she found Mr.
'And will she go about in a plain shawl, and a large straw bonnet, carrying tracts and bone soup to her husband's poor parishioners?'
Parishioners dropped in by twos and threes, deposited themselves in rows before her, rested three-quarters of a minute on their foreheads as if they were praying, though they were not; then sat up, and looked around.
Elizabeth was chiefly struck by his extraordinary deference for Lady Catherine, and his kind intention of christening, marrying, and burying his parishioners whenever it were required.
The public spirit of my parishioners asks for nothing but money and beer.