parity

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par·i·ty 1

 (păr′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. par·i·ties
1. Equality, as in amount, status, or value.
2. Functional equivalence, as in the weaponry or military strength of adversaries: "A problem that has troubled the U.S.-Soviet relationship from the beginning has been the issue of parity" (Charles William Maynes).
3. The equivalent in value of a sum of money expressed in terms of a different currency at a fixed official rate of exchange.
4. Equality of prices of goods or securities in two different markets.
5. A level for farm-product prices maintained by governmental support and intended to give farmers the same purchasing power they had during a chosen base period.
6. Mathematics The even or odd quality of an integer. If two integers are both odd or both even, they are said to have the same parity; if one is odd and one even, they have different parity.
7. Abbr. P Physics
a. An intrinsic symmetry property of a physical system, such as a subatomic particle, that specifies how the system would behave if the three spatial coordinates were reversed from x, y, z to -x, -y, -z.
b. A quantum number, either +1 (even) or -1 (odd), that mathematically represents this property.
8. Computers
a. The even or odd quality of the number of 1's or 0's in a binary code, often used to determine the integrity of data especially after transmission.
b. A parity bit.

[French parité, from Old French parite, from Late Latin paritās, from pār, par-, equal; see pair.]

par·i·ty 2

 (păr′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. The condition of having given birth.
2. The number of children borne by one woman.

[Latin parere, to give birth, bring forth; see perə- in Indo-European roots + -ity.]

parity

(ˈpærɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. equality of rank, pay, etc
2. close or exact analogy or equivalence
3. (Banking & Finance) finance
a. the amount of a foreign currency equivalent at the established exchange rate to a specific sum of domestic currency
b. a similar equivalence between different forms of the same national currency, esp the gold equivalent of a unit of gold-standard currency
4. (Banking & Finance) equality between prices of commodities or securities in two separate markets
5. (General Physics) physics
a. a property of a physical system characterized by the behaviour of the sign of its wave function when all spatial coordinates are reversed in direction. The wave function either remains unchanged (even parity) or changes in sign (odd parity)
b. a quantum number describing this property, equal to +1 for even parity systems and –1 for odd parity systems. Symbol: P See also conservation of parity
6. (Mathematics) maths a relationship between two integers. If both are odd or both even they have the same parity; if one is odd and one even they have different parity
7. (Agriculture) (in the US) a system of government support for farm products
[C16: from Late Latin pāritās; see par]

parity

(ˈpærɪtɪ)
n
1. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) the condition or fact of having given birth
2. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) the number of children to which a woman has given birth
[C19: from Latin parere to bear]

par•i•ty1

(ˈpær ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. equality, as in amount, status, or character.
2. equivalence or correspondence; similarity.
3.
a. equivalent value in the currency of another country.
b. equivalent value at a fixed ratio between moneys of different metals.
4. the property of symmetry between a subatomic particle and its mirror image, indicated by + 1 if the two are indistinguishable and by −1 if they are different.
5. a system of regulating prices of farm commodities, usu. by government price supports, to provide farmers with the same purchasing power they had in a selected base period.
6. the status, as even or odd, of the total number of bits per byte or word: used to detect errors in a computer system or in data communications.
[1565–75; < Late Latin paritās. See par, -ity]

par•i•ty2

(ˈpær ɪ ti)

n.
1. the condition of having borne offspring.
[1875–80; < Latin par(ere) to bring forth (compare parent) + -ity]

parity

the state, quality, or fact of having given birth to or having borne offspring.
See also: Birth
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parity - (obstetrics) the number of liveborn children a woman has delivered; "the parity of the mother must be considered"; "a bipara is a woman who has given birth to two children"
midwifery, obstetrics, tocology, OB - the branch of medicine dealing with childbirth and care of the mother
maternity, pregnancy, gestation - the state of being pregnant; the period from conception to birth when a woman carries a developing fetus in her uterus
2.parity - (mathematics) a relation between a pair of integers: if both integers are odd or both are even they have the same parity; if one is odd and the other is even they have different parity; "parity is often used to check the integrity of transmitted data"
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
mathematical relation - a relation between mathematical expressions (such as equality or inequality)
evenness - the parity of even numbers (divisible by two)
oddness - the parity of odd numbers (not divisible by two)
3.parity - (computer science) a bit that is used in an error detection procedure in which a 0 or 1 is added to each group of bits so that it will have either an odd number of 1's or an even number of 1's; e.g., if the parity is odd then any group of bits that arrives with an even number of 1's must contain an error
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
bit - a unit of measurement of information (from binary + digit); the amount of information in a system having two equiprobable states; "there are 8 bits in a byte"
4.parity - (physics) parity is conserved in a universe in which the laws of physics are the same in a right-handed system of coordinates as in a left-handed systemparity - (physics) parity is conserved in a universe in which the laws of physics are the same in a right-handed system of coordinates as in a left-handed system
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
conservation - (physics) the maintenance of a certain quantities unchanged during chemical reactions or physical transformations
5.parity - functional equality
equivalence - essential equality and interchangeability

parity

noun equality, correspondence, consistency, equivalence, quits (informal), par, unity, similarity, likeness, uniformity, equal terms, sameness, parallelism, congruity Women have yet to achieve wage parity with men in many fields.

parity

noun
The state of being equivalent:
Translations

parity

[ˈpærɪtɪ] N (Fin etc) → paridad f; [of wages, conditions] → igualdad f
exchange at paritycambio m a la par

parity

[ˈpærɪti] nparité f

parity

n
(= equality)Gleichstellung f; (of opportunities) → Gleichheit f; parity of treatmentGleichstellung f; parity of payLohngleichheit f
(= equivalence)Übereinstimmung f; by parity of reasoningmit den gleichen Argumenten
(Fin, Sci) → Parität f; the parity of the dollardie Dollarparität
(US Agr) → Preisparität f
(Comput) → Parität f; odd/even parityungerade/gerade Parität

parity

[ˈpærɪtɪ] nparità
References in periodicals archive ?
Reproduction traits in the first and later parities would be treated as different traits because of differences in the stage of development of the reproductive system [4,5].
In multivariate analyses, women without any sons were more likely than women without any daughters to continue childbearing at parities 1-4 (odds ratios, 1.
Specifically, strong state parities are those that require equality in all cost-sharing dimensions and allow no exemptions, while medium parity laws, though comprehensive in coverage, allow exemptions for small employers, exemptions for employers that experience cost increase due to the mandate, or contain "ff offered" provisions.
Gold exports, pegging operations, and large sales of foreign securities partially shielded the fixed structure of the world's exchange rates, but Great Britain and its allies depended on international borrowing as the key weapon in their defense of exchange rate parities.
On the one hand, some studies have found that son preference is associated with a larger ideal family size (17) and discourages women of lower parities from using contraceptives, which in turn acts as a barrier to reducing fertility.