parochially


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Related to parochially: parochialist

pa·ro·chi·al

 (pə-rō′kē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, supported by, or located in a parish.
2. Of or relating to parochial schools.
3. Narrowly restricted in scope or outlook; provincial: parochial attitudes.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin parochiālis, from parochia, diocese; see parish.]

pa·ro′chi·al·ism n.
pa·ro′chi·al·ist n.
pa·ro′chi·al·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.parochially - in a parochial manner; "parochially narrow in his outlook"
Translations

parochially

[pəˈrəʊkɪlɪ] adv (fig) (pej) → campanilisticamente
References in periodicals archive ?
The group, therefore, called on Deltans and beyond to ignore 'the parochially, selfishly and maliciously motivated publication.'
(This still, rather parochially, treated the nuclear family as the center of all cultures.) Anthropology hadn't covered itself in glory in the previous 50 years: Some of its biggest names, such as Earnest Hooton and Eugen Fischer, had gone all in on the "race science" that drove Nazism and eugenics.
As far as the mortals you teach, they're probably thinking too parochially.
This other category might encompass those respondents who identified more globally and less parochially with specific national identifications.
beyond their boundaries and cannot be parochially confined to the
Unable to arrive at political accommodations for the greater good of the community they purport to serve, it is difficult to imagine a more parochially arrogant collective.
The Opposition won parochially but lost democratically.
As Ebeling puts it: "In the Biblical tradition, the Word of God has to be understood as a word-event which does not become obsolete, but constantly renews itself, does not seclude itself parochially, but opens up the world, and does not result in uniformization, but is language-creating (...), liberating us to our own present.
Even states that have historically faced a high rate of outmigration of skilled people can parochially benefit economically from improved schools because sufficient numbers of their own students will remain.
constructions of identity rooted parochially not only in the social movements that emerged there, but in the demographic projects of that nation-state that inform how "communities of struggle" have formed and understand their normative subjects in (anti-)segregationist terms.
Their books stand out because although they are targeted at mainstream audiences, they are not parochially Jewish.
The culture of the foreign service perhaps may be somewhat parochially Anglo-American.