parody

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Related to parodically: parodistic

par·o·dy

 (păr′ə-dē)
n. pl. par·o·dies
1.
a. A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
b. A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
2. Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty: The trial was a parody of justice.
3. Music The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
tr.v. par·o·died, par·o·dy·ing, par·o·dies
To make a parody of. See Synonyms at imitate.

[Latin parōdia, from Greek parōidiā : para-, subsidiary to; see para-1 + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·rod′ic (pə-rŏd′ĭk), pa·rod′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
par′o·dist n.
par′o·dis′tic adj.

parody

(ˈpærədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
2. (Music, other) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
3. mimicry of someone's individual manner in a humorous or satirical way
4. something so badly done as to seem an intentional mockery; travesty
vb, -dies, -dying or -died
(tr) to make a parody of
[C16: via Latin from Greek paroidiā satirical poem, from para-1 + ōidē song]
parodic, paˈrodical adj
ˈparodist n

par•o•dy

(ˈpær ə di)

n., pl. -dies, n.
1. a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing.
2. the genre of literary composition represented by such imitations.
3. any humorous, satirical, or burlesque imitation, as of a person, event, etc.
4. a burlesque imitation of a musical composition.
5. a poor or feeble imitation; travesty.
v.t.
6. to imitate (a composition, author, etc.) for purposes of ridicule or satire.
7. to imitate feebly; travesty.
[1590–1600; < Latin parōdia < Greek parōidía a burlesque song or poem. See par-, ode, -y3]
par′o•di•a•ble, adj.
syn: See burlesque.

parody


Past participle: parodied
Gerund: parodying

Imperative
parody
parody
Present
I parody
you parody
he/she/it parodies
we parody
you parody
they parody
Preterite
I parodied
you parodied
he/she/it parodied
we parodied
you parodied
they parodied
Present Continuous
I am parodying
you are parodying
he/she/it is parodying
we are parodying
you are parodying
they are parodying
Present Perfect
I have parodied
you have parodied
he/she/it has parodied
we have parodied
you have parodied
they have parodied
Past Continuous
I was parodying
you were parodying
he/she/it was parodying
we were parodying
you were parodying
they were parodying
Past Perfect
I had parodied
you had parodied
he/she/it had parodied
we had parodied
you had parodied
they had parodied
Future
I will parody
you will parody
he/she/it will parody
we will parody
you will parody
they will parody
Future Perfect
I will have parodied
you will have parodied
he/she/it will have parodied
we will have parodied
you will have parodied
they will have parodied
Future Continuous
I will be parodying
you will be parodying
he/she/it will be parodying
we will be parodying
you will be parodying
they will be parodying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been parodying
you have been parodying
he/she/it has been parodying
we have been parodying
you have been parodying
they have been parodying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
he/she/it will have been parodying
we will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
they will have been parodying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been parodying
you had been parodying
he/she/it had been parodying
we had been parodying
you had been parodying
they had been parodying
Conditional
I would parody
you would parody
he/she/it would parody
we would parody
you would parody
they would parody
Past Conditional
I would have parodied
you would have parodied
he/she/it would have parodied
we would have parodied
you would have parodied
they would have parodied

parody

Imitating another work or style with intention to ridicule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous wayparody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
2.parody - humorous or satirical mimicry
apery, mimicry - the act of mimicking; imitative behavior
Verb1.parody - make a spoof of or make fun of
act, play, represent - play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"
2.parody - make a parody of; "The students spoofed the teachers"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
travesty - make a travesty of

parody

noun
1. takeoff (informal), imitation, satire, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque a parody of a well-know soap opera
2. travesty, farce, caricature, mockery, apology for His trial was a parody of justice.
verb
1. take off (informal), mimic, caricature, send up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, lampoon, poke fun at, burlesque, take the piss out of (taboo slang), satirize, do a takeoff of (informal) It was easy to parody his rather pompous manner of speaking.

parody

noun
1. A usually amusing caricature of another:
Informal: takeoff.
2. A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
Translations
مُحاكاة تَهَكُّمِيَّهمُحاكاة سَيِّئَهيُحاكي بصورةٍ ساخِرَه
parodieparodovat
parodiparodiereefterligne
parodiaparodioida
paródiaparodizálutánzat
skopstælaskopstæling, parodíaskrumskæling
parodijaparodijuoti
kropļojums, parodijaparodētparodija
parodiaparodiować
parodovať
alay yoluyla yermekhicvetmekhicviyekötü taklitparodi

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
A. Nparodia f
B. VTparodiar

parody

[ˈpærədi]
nparodie f
The film was a brilliant parody of American life → Le film était une géniale parodie du mode de vie américain.
vtparodier
a sketch parodying his views → un sketch parodiant ses vues

parody

n
Parodie f (→ of auf +acc)
(= travesty)Abklatsch m; a parody of justiceeine Parodie auf die Gerechtigkeit
vtparodieren

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
1. nparodia
2. vtparodiare

parody

(ˈpӕrədi) plural ˈparodies noun
1. an amusing imitation of a serious author's style of writing. He writes parodies of John Donne's poems.
2. a very bad imitation. a parody of the truth.
verb
to make a parody of (something or someone).
References in periodicals archive ?
But in setting this pair of male celibates within an arrangement that parodically reconstitutes Sarah and Henry's marriage rather than a monastery, parish church, or seminary, Greene's ending also redeems the domestic sphere.
It may seem like a detour to look at all these paintings of almost parodically Dutch themes such as flowers and canals.
As described at the outset, the very life of the main character Arturo not only is parodically determined by the Mafia, but somehow originated in a bloody event perpetrated by it.
The conclusion argues that while in Doctor Hoffman the feminist rebellion remains within male hegemony, the text parodically foregrounds the politics of the representation of the body.
Swinburne's description, in line with the Petrarchan tradition which is employed half parodically in "Faustine", reveals the depths of the male speaker's mind while the poem seemingly portrays the magnificence of the beloved's dangerous beauty.
In a novel so strongly feminist, however, this status is simultaneously and seriously undermined by the rhetorical text of his narrative discourse, which, even when it is not speaking directly against women, is consistently, blatandy, and parodically, misogynistic.
That is, in Butlerian terms, it parodically represents many normative elements of the dominant literary form of its day, and in so doing reveals that form's fundamentally constructed, arbitrary, even grotesque character.
Both Sandra's gender identity as well as her use of parodically inverted religious discourse are, in essence, constructed as a reaction against Manon.
The comic potential of parodically repurposing classical myth clearly shows in Faulkner's retelling of Io transformed to a cow, which, in its crazy allegorical logic, equates Ike with Jupiter.
These preliminary speeches, in which the Jews parodically speak regarding orthodox doctrine, recapitulate the play's ideological concerns regarding language.
From this perspective, the male-authored text (and by extension the male author himself) is of feminist interest only in relation to women (and, until recently, only the strikingly, almost parodically misogynist texts were considered useful for such purposes).
Finally, Arab suggests in her last chapter that depictions of the parodically dispassionate masculinity of shopkeepers in Jacobean city comedy are symptomatic of the increasing breakdown of social boundaries and the rise of a new, urbane ideal of masculinity grounded in the demands of the marketplace and the relatively effeminate activity of selling that gradually eclipsed manly manufacture.