parody

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par·o·dy

 (păr′ə-dē)
n. pl. par·o·dies
1.
a. A literary or artistic work that uses imitation, as of the characteristic style of an author or a work, for comic effect or ridicule.
b. A genre, as in literature, comprising such works.
2. Something so bad as to be equivalent to intentional mockery; a travesty: The trial was a parody of justice.
3. Music The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.
tr.v. par·o·died, par·o·dy·ing, par·o·dies
To make a parody of. See Synonyms at imitate.

[Latin parōdia, from Greek parōidiā : para-, subsidiary to; see para-1 + aoidē, ōidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·rod′ic (pə-rŏd′ĭk), pa·rod′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
par′o·dist n.
par′o·dis′tic adj.

parody

(ˈpærədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
2. (Music, other) a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way
3. mimicry of someone's individual manner in a humorous or satirical way
4. something so badly done as to seem an intentional mockery; travesty
vb, -dies, -dying or -died
(tr) to make a parody of
[C16: via Latin from Greek paroidiā satirical poem, from para-1 + ōidē song]
parodic, paˈrodical adj
ˈparodist n

par•o•dy

(ˈpær ə di)

n., pl. -dies, n.
1. a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing.
2. the genre of literary composition represented by such imitations.
3. any humorous, satirical, or burlesque imitation, as of a person, event, etc.
4. a burlesque imitation of a musical composition.
5. a poor or feeble imitation; travesty.
v.t.
6. to imitate (a composition, author, etc.) for purposes of ridicule or satire.
7. to imitate feebly; travesty.
[1590–1600; < Latin parōdia < Greek parōidía a burlesque song or poem. See par-, ode, -y3]
par′o•di•a•ble, adj.
syn: See burlesque.

parody


Past participle: parodied
Gerund: parodying

Imperative
parody
parody
Present
I parody
you parody
he/she/it parodies
we parody
you parody
they parody
Preterite
I parodied
you parodied
he/she/it parodied
we parodied
you parodied
they parodied
Present Continuous
I am parodying
you are parodying
he/she/it is parodying
we are parodying
you are parodying
they are parodying
Present Perfect
I have parodied
you have parodied
he/she/it has parodied
we have parodied
you have parodied
they have parodied
Past Continuous
I was parodying
you were parodying
he/she/it was parodying
we were parodying
you were parodying
they were parodying
Past Perfect
I had parodied
you had parodied
he/she/it had parodied
we had parodied
you had parodied
they had parodied
Future
I will parody
you will parody
he/she/it will parody
we will parody
you will parody
they will parody
Future Perfect
I will have parodied
you will have parodied
he/she/it will have parodied
we will have parodied
you will have parodied
they will have parodied
Future Continuous
I will be parodying
you will be parodying
he/she/it will be parodying
we will be parodying
you will be parodying
they will be parodying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been parodying
you have been parodying
he/she/it has been parodying
we have been parodying
you have been parodying
they have been parodying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
he/she/it will have been parodying
we will have been parodying
you will have been parodying
they will have been parodying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been parodying
you had been parodying
he/she/it had been parodying
we had been parodying
you had been parodying
they had been parodying
Conditional
I would parody
you would parody
he/she/it would parody
we would parody
you would parody
they would parody
Past Conditional
I would have parodied
you would have parodied
he/she/it would have parodied
we would have parodied
you would have parodied
they would have parodied

parody

Imitating another work or style with intention to ridicule.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous wayparody - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
2.parody - humorous or satirical mimicry
apery, mimicry - the act of mimicking; imitative behavior
Verb1.parody - make a spoof of or make fun of
act, play, represent - play a role or part; "Gielgud played Hamlet"; "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"; "She played the servant to her husband's master"
2.parody - make a parody of; "The students spoofed the teachers"
mock - imitate with mockery and derision; "The children mocked their handicapped classmate"
travesty - make a travesty of

parody

noun
1. takeoff (informal), imitation, satire, caricature, send-up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), lampoon, skit, burlesque a parody of a well-know soap opera
2. travesty, farce, caricature, mockery, apology for His trial was a parody of justice.
verb
1. take off (informal), mimic, caricature, send up (Brit. informal), spoof (informal), travesty, lampoon, poke fun at, burlesque, take the piss out of (taboo slang), satirize, do a takeoff of (informal) It was easy to parody his rather pompous manner of speaking.

parody

noun
1. A usually amusing caricature of another:
Informal: takeoff.
2. A false, derisive, or impudent imitation of something:
verb
To copy (the manner or expression of another), especially in an exaggerated or mocking way:
Translations
مُحاكاة تَهَكُّمِيَّهمُحاكاة سَيِّئَهيُحاكي بصورةٍ ساخِرَه
parodieparodovat
parodiparodiereefterligne
parodiaparodioida
paródiaparodizálutánzat
skopstælaskopstæling, parodíaskrumskæling
parodijaparodijuoti
kropļojums, parodijaparodētparodija
parodiaparodiować
parodovať
alay yoluyla yermekhicvetmekhicviyekötü taklitparodi

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
A. Nparodia f
B. VTparodiar

parody

[ˈpærədi]
nparodie f
The film was a brilliant parody of American life → Le film était une géniale parodie du mode de vie américain.
vtparodier
a sketch parodying his views → un sketch parodiant ses vues

parody

n
Parodie f (→ of auf +acc)
(= travesty)Abklatsch m; a parody of justiceeine Parodie auf die Gerechtigkeit
vtparodieren

parody

[ˈpærədɪ]
1. nparodia
2. vtparodiare

parody

(ˈpӕrədi) plural ˈparodies noun
1. an amusing imitation of a serious author's style of writing. He writes parodies of John Donne's poems.
2. a very bad imitation. a parody of the truth.
verb
to make a parody of (something or someone).
References in classic literature ?
Homer, for example, makes men better than they are; Cleophon as they are; Hegemon the Thasian, the inventor of parodies, and Nicochares, the author of the Deiliad, worse than they are.
As I lounged upon the green bank, I lazily watched these parodies of humanity as they were tossed hither and thither with humourous indignity by the breeze, remarking to myself on the quaint shamelessness with which we thus expose to the public view garments which at other times we are at such bashful pains to conceal.
My misfortune was to carry it into print when I began to write a story, in the Ik Marvel manner, or rather to compose it in type at the case, for that was what I did; and it was not altogether imitated from Ik Marvel either, for I drew upon the easier art of Dickens at times, and helped myself out with bald parodies of Bleak House in many places.
Max Beerbohm in a volume of parodies entitled "A Christmas Garland," where I found myself in very good company.
When she had exhibited these leviathans of public announcement to the astonished child, she brought forth specimens of the lesser fry in the shape of hand-bills, some of which were couched in the form of parodies on popular melodies, as 'Believe me if all Jarley's wax-work so rare'--'I saw thy show in youthful prime'--'Over the water to Jarley;' while, to consult all tastes, others were composed with a view to the lighter and more facetious spirits, as a parody on the favourite air of 'If I had a donkey,' beginning
Between them and the beasts behind me there was little choice, but at least there was a doubt as to the reception these grotesque parodies on humanity would accord me, while there was none as to the fate which awaited me beneath the grinning fangs of my fierce pursuers.
The "bulls" he had recognized from the ape's crude description as the grotesque parodies upon humanity who inhabit the ruins of Opar.
After howling out hugot lines to the super blue blood moon, Filipino netizens have now resorted to creating parodies of the eclipse.
TV parodies are gaining momentum thanks to social media and viral videos, with some popular Web series making the jump to TV.
In a recent interview, Yankovic discussed the surprise success of his new album -- which also features parodies of Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines'' and Lorde's "Royals'' -- and the accompanying music video-turned-viral hits.
As for parody, Gurenci Saglam points out that the two major genres that Ackroyd parodies in his fiction are detective story and biography, along with autobiography as the confessional form.