paroxytone

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par·ox·y·tone

 (pă-rŏk′sĭ-tōn′)
adj.
Having an acute accent on the next to last syllable. Used of some words in Greek and certain Romance languages, such as French and Portuguese.
n.
A paroxytone word.

[Greek paroxutonos : para-, beside; see para-1 + oxutonos, oxytone; see oxytone.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

paroxytone

(pəˈrɒksɪˌtəʊn)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) (in the classical Greek language) of, relating to, or denoting words having an acute accent on the next to last syllable
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a paroxytone word
[C18: via New Latin from Greek paroxutonos, from para-1 (beside) + -oxutonos oxytone]
paroxytonic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paroxytone - word having stress or acute accent on the next to last syllable
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
An interesting aspect that emerges upon analyzing our results--see figure 4--is that there is an inverse correlation between presence and level in the case of oxytones, and a direct correlation in the case of paroxytones and proparoxytones.
Apart from the technical terms and descriptions used above, there is the subdivision into oxytone, paroxytone and proparoxytone structures, the value that PRI assigns to <a>, and the boxes marked with NA for domains where a particular rule is "not applicable." A word like aluminum, for example, which would fit into the PR6 type will be interpreted according to PR3.2 because PR6 is not applicable to the <u> domain (Bozman 1988, 48).
Paroxytone and proparoxytone rules might be quite profitably dealt with at later stages.
Polish can employ monosyllabic words for masculine rhymes in a more or less artful way (all words with two or more syllables are paroxytones); since the middle of the nineteenth century such rhymes, masculine alternating with feminine, have been common.
C-final paroxytones. An OO analysis like the one proposed here finds further support in that it explains the ill-formedness of "double plurals" with C-final paroxytones, e.g.
In order to find out the phonological units that better account for the rising F0 trajectories in the two languages, I recorded one English and one Spanish native speaker producing 45 declarative sentences which contained words with different stress distributions (oxytones, paroxytones and proparoxytones) in prenuclear position.
In order to find out the phonological primes that account for prenuclear F0 rises, recordings were made of one English and one Spanish native speaker producing 45 declarative sentences which contained words with different stress distribution in prenuclear position: oxytones (words with stress on the final syllable and thus no postaccentual syllables within the word), paroxytones (words with stress on the penultimante syllable and thus one postaccentual syllable within the word) and proparoxytones (words with stress on the antepenultimate syllable and thus two postaccentual syllables within the word).
The status of L is investigated in words with different stress distributions (oxytones, paroxytones, and proparoxytones) in subject and verb focal positions.
In order to determine the status of L after the focal element in the two languages, focal words with different stress distributions were used, namely, oxytones (words with stress on the ultimate syllable), paroxytones (words with stress on the penultimate syllable), and proparoxytones (words with stress on the antepenultimate syllable).
The "thematic" type, on the other hand, seems to have originally been oxytone, the exceptions being two instances, usinarani- and purukutsani-, where the derivative imitates the accent of its basis, and one further case, mudgalani-, (15) where the accent is paroxytone just as in the "athematics."