parricidal


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par·ri·cide

 (păr′ĭ-sīd′)
n.
1. The killing of one's father, mother, or other near relative.
2. The killing of the ruler of one's country.
3. One who commits parricide.

[Latin parricīdium and parricīda : pāri-, parri-, kin + -cīdium. -cīda, -cide.]

par′ri·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
par′ri·cid′al·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet such self-flattering appeals to obligation further distance Lucy from acknowledging--until freezing to death--her parricidal compulsion.
This, he suggested, is the kernel of the western subject's obsessive quest to know the truth of their humanity; not so as to rid Thebes of the plague or to deny an incestuous and parricidal prophesy, but to answer the capillary and normalised command 'tell me who you are'.
H]e constantly repeated that the new forces were anarchical, and especially that he was not responsible for the new rays, that were little short of parricidal in their wicked spirit towards science.
Brutus' parricidal adoption of the people is emblematic of rulership, for natural bonds cease in the public sphere (in publicis locis).
These teams carried out parricidal sprays at 209 and fogging activity at 262 potential breeding sites of dengue mosquito, while spraying activity has been done at 538 different places of the Federal Capital.
Last of his race, for victims of his maw, With fratricidal, parricidal jaw, His rage had each contemporary slain; Crack'd every bone, sucked marrow, spine, and brain.
The writers found common cause with their sons, almost as if to counteract the Revolution's apparent parricidal implications.
Think of Racines Phedre in which the father's act is the parricidal prayer to Neptune condemning his son and in which later the event occurs--Hippolyte dies while confronting a sea monster apparently sent by Neptune--that fulfils the fathers earlier wish, even after the father is no longer sure that this is what he wishes.
In Bandarshah, Salih refashions Freud's theory into an allegory in which the parricidal impulse of the grandson (Meryoud) conspires with the preemptive violence of the grandfather (Bandarshah), both of whose interests unite in killing the father (Bandarshah's eleven sons).
Best news of all though was that Alice Morgan - the parricidal redhead from the very first series of Luther - was back to no doubt help him out of this latest tight spot.