parson's nose


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Related to parson's nose: pope's nose

par·son's nose

 (pär′sənz)
n. Informal

parson's nose

n
(Cookery) the fatty extreme end portion of the tail of a fowl when cooked. Also called: pope's nose
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parson's nose - the tail of a dressed fowl
helping, serving, portion - an individual quantity of food or drink taken as part of a meal; "the helpings were all small"; "his portion was larger than hers"; "there's enough for two servings each"
bird, fowl - the flesh of a bird or fowl (wild or domestic) used as food
Translations

parson's nose

nboccone m del prete
References in periodicals archive ?
There were plenty of cheers, however, when he referenced famous Coventry city centre chip shop the Parson's Nose early on, but, in the main, the group let their music do the talking.
But, before we sit down to the feast, he always presents me with the crispy, delicious parson's nose - and my nephews pretend to be "grossed out" that I'd eat it such a foul part of a fowl's anatomy.
Using meat scissors, cut on one side of parson's nose (tail) and all along spine to neck end.
Place the chicken breast-side down with legs towards you, take a strong pair of scissors and cut along each side of the parson's nose and backbone, cutting through the rib bones.
Is it that time when you can't pass WH Smith without coming nose to parson's nose with a turkey?
Then there was the DA, named because it looked like the egg-laying end of a duck, in crude terms, a duck's a**e, a parson's nose with a parting.
He was found by other walkers at around 11am close to a scrambling route known as Parson's Nose.
Walkers on the mountain made the gruesome discovery after stumbling across the man's body on Parson's Nose Arete, 2,500ft up on the mountain.
Listed in the Good Beer Guide 2013 are beers called Bishop's Finger, Bishop's Tipple, Parson's Nose and Vicar's Ruin.
To prepare the pheasant, remove the parson's nose and trim up any excess fat.
I season in the "parson's nose" which allows the salt and pepper to be absorbed from the inside.