partial reinforcement


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Related to partial reinforcement: Continuous Reinforcement

partial reinforcement

n
(Psychology) psychol the process of randomly rewarding an organism for making a response on only some of the occasions it makes it
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References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, it is reported that the introduction of partial reinforcement in the first goal of a double runway led to a greater response in the second runway immediately after omission than after reinforcement delivery (1).
However, Tomash and Reed (2015) found the opposite results with regard to the impact of partial reinforcement using a skin conductance response procedure.
Investigators enrolled 56 patients who had had a response to a priming phase of 4 weeks of nightly zolpidem (Ambien) 10 mg and assigned them to three maintenance strategies: nightly dosing, intermittent dosing (whereby the drug was taken 3-5 nights per week of the patient's choice), and partial reinforcement dosing (whereby a capsule was taken every night, but half were placebos).
Context-outcome associations underlie context-switch effects after partial reinforcement in human predictive learning
Tied to plan continuation bias is the old psychological principle of partial reinforcement. Simply put, it's why casinos win staggering sums of money from people who gamble.
Frustrative nonreward in partial reinforcement and discrimination learning.
Also, the partial reinforcement effect (the tendency for organisms to persist in a behavior longer when they are not reinforced for every desired behavior) can be modeled by providing continuous reinforcement to one dog for sitting and providing another dog with a treat after sitting on command three consecutive times (a fixed-ratio or FR-3 schedule) and then stopping reinforcement altogether.
The discrimination hypothesis for the partial reinforcement effect posits that fixed reinforcement schedules are more discriminable from extinction than variable reinforcement schedules are (Mowrer & Jones, 1945).
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