partialist

partialist

(ˈpɑːʃəlɪst)
n
1. a person who is partial
2. (Theology) theol a particularist
References in classic literature ?
Very fitly therefore I assert that every man is a partialist, that nature secures him as an instrument by self-conceit, preventing the tendencies to religion and science; and now further assert, that, each man's genius being nearly and affectionately explored, he is justified in his individuality, as his nature is found to be immense; and now I add that every man is a universalist also, and, as our earth, whilst it spins on its own axis, spins all the time around the sun through the celestial spaces, so the least of its rational children, the most dedicated to his private affair, works out, though as it were under a disguise, the universal problem.
Is it that every man believes every other to be an incurable partialist, and himself a universalist?
The first plenary, "Dismantling a Partialist Health Care System: Implementing a Vision for Comprehensive Population Based Care," featured a panel of experts discussing innovations and policy changes related to furthering the integration of behavioral health and primary care, moderated by Kristian Foden-Vencil, Reporter and Producer, Oregon Public Broadcasting.
The place where the partialist analysis breaks down, he argues, is with the assumption that the nation-state is solely a cultural community.
Armed with the theoretical background of care ethics as partialist, we can now begin to make sense of her judgment.
And the kind of friendship Merrill's style inclines toward is indeed based on small partialist communities of friends rather than on a more democratic and impartialist notion of respect.
In section 1, the author describes the problem of distance and some impartialist and partialist responses to it.
The partialist defense of the rights of states to distribute membership is not, however, without its problems.
Thus, extra weight can be given to partialist concerns, acts of caring, and so on through the list of alternative values.
Forced to choose between impartial universalism and partialist loyalties, Fletcher choose loyalties.
Very fitly, therefore, I assert, that every man is a partialist, that nature secures him as an instrument by self-conceit, preventing the tendencies to religion and science; [.
When loyalty receives attention from contemporary philosophers, it is usually in the context of the debate between partialists, who think that moral commitments must ultimately reduce to commitments to particular individuals or communities, and impartialists, who think morality must be strongly universalista.