partibility


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partibility

(ˌpɑːtəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
the quality of being partible
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise, the interaction with the dead observed here as the purposeful selection and curation of specific elements buried tightly in subterranean pits has been noted by Geller (2012:117,121-122) to imply a "partibility" that facilitated a change in identity after death of an individual.
These are seen as varying from place to place depending on the landlord's control, while issues such as partibility and socage affected local inheritance customs.
They cover epistemology, subjectivity, and the ethics of knowing others; persons, sociality, and value: partibility as sacrifice, consumption, and investment; mobilizing power and belonging: the local in a global world; and knowledge exchange and the creativity of relationships: contextualizing and recontextualizing knowledge.
qualities, i.e., position, mobility, partibility to legal relations).
Theoretically, this study synthesizes selected elements of Marshall Sahlins's (1985) celebrated structural history programme with the dynamics of 'personal partibility' drawn from the New Melanesian Ethnography (hereafter 'NME') inspired by the work of Marilyn Strathern (1988) and Roy Wagner (1974), among others.
Leyser describes the careful political checks and balances Otto exercised with regards to his Saxon enemies in a system not governed by primogeniture but with a family structure "where partibility and co-hereditas rule descent" (10).
The most frequent result was a kind of preferential partibility. When a man died, his widow was left with only one-third of the patrimony; a widower, two-thirds.
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