participle


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Related to participle: present participle

participle

Participles are words formed from verbs that can function as adjectives or gerunds or can be used to form the continuous tenses and the perfect tenses of verbs. There are two participle forms: the present participle and the past participle.
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par·ti·ci·ple

 (pär′tĭ-sĭp′əl)
n.
A form of a verb that in some languages, such as English, can function independently as an adjective, as the past participle baked in We had some baked beans, and is used with an auxiliary verb to indicate tense, aspect, or voice, as the past participle baked in the passive sentence The beans were baked too long.

[Middle English, from Old French, variant of participe, from Latin participium (translation of Greek metokhē, sharing, partaking, participle), from particeps, particip-, partaker; see participate.]
Usage Note: Participial phrases such as walking down the street or having finished her homework are commonly used in English to modify nouns or pronouns, but care must be taken in incorporating such phrases into sentences. Readers will ordinarily associate a participle with the noun, noun phrase, or pronoun adjacent to it, and misplacement may produce comic effects as in He watched his horse take a turn around the track carrying a racing sheet under his arm. A correctly placed participial phrase leaves no doubt about what is being modified: Sitting at her desk, Jane read the letter carefully. · Another pitfall in using participial phrases is illustrated in the following sentence: Turning the corner, the view was quite different. Grammarians would say that such a sentence contains a "dangling participle" because there is no noun or pronoun in the sentence that the participial phrase can logically modify. Moving the phrase will not solve the problem (as it would in the sentence about the horse with a racing sheet). To avoid distracting the reader, it would be better to recast the sentence as When we turned the corner, the view was quite different or Turning the corner, we had a different view. · A number of expressions originally derived from participles have become prepositions, and these may be used to introduce phrases that are not associated with the immediately adjacent noun phrase. Such expressions include concerning, considering, failing, granting, judging by, and speaking of. Thus one may write without fear of criticism Speaking of politics, the elections have been postponed or Considering the hour, it is surprising that he arrived at all. See Note at very.

participle

(ˈpɑːtɪsɪpəl; pɑːˈtɪsɪpəl)
n
(Grammar) a nonfinite form of verbs, in English and other languages, used adjectivally and in the formation of certain compound tenses. See also present participle, past participle
[C14: via Old French from Latin participium, from particeps partaker, from pars part + capere to take]
participial adj, n
ˌpartiˈcipially adv

par•ti•ci•ple

(ˈpɑr təˌsɪp əl, -sə pəl)

n.
a nonfinite verbal form that can function as an adjective or be used with certain auxiliaries to make compound verb forms, as burning in a burning candle or devoted in your devoted friend. Abbr.: part. Compare past participle, present participle.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French, variant of participe < Latin participium, derivative (with -ium -ium1) of particeps taking part =parti- (s. of pars) part + -cep- (comb. form of capere to take) + -s nominative singular ending]
usage: See dangling participle, misplaced modifier.

participle

A form of a verb that can also function as an adjective, such as “cooked” or “pressing.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.participle - a non-finite form of the verb; in English it is used adjectivally and to form compound tenses
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
present participle - a participle expressing present action; in English is formed by adding -ing
past participle, perfect participle - a participle that expresses completed action
Translations
příčestí
partisiippi
particip
melléknévi igenév
lýsingarháttur
分詞
partisipp
deležnik
particip

participle

[ˈpɑːtɪsɪpl] Nparticipio m
past participleparticipio m pasado or pasivo
present participleparticipio m activo or (de) presente

participle

[ˈpɑːrtɪsɪpəl] nparticipe m

participle

nPartizip nt ? present, past

participle

[pɑːˈtɪsɪpl] nparticipio
past/present participle → participio passato/presente

participle

(ˈpaːˈtisipl) noun
word formed from a verb, used either to form compound tenses or as an adjective or noun. ('going' and 'gone' are the present and past participle of 'go'.)
References in classic literature ?
The first project was, to shorten discourse, by cutting polysyllables into one, and leaving out verbs and participles, because, in reality, all things imaginable are but norms.
Occasionally, merely for the pleasure of being cruel, we put unoffending Frenchmen on the rack with questions framed in the incomprehensible jargon of their native language, and while they writhed we impaled them, we peppered them, we scarified them, with their own vile verbs and participles.
Out of this, the facetious habit had arisen in the neighbourhood surrounding Mincing Lane of making christian names for him of adjectives and participles beginning with R.
This is also its most likely function in the CPA expression pronoun + Participle.
Lay (past participle): Why have you laid that stupid magazine on the table I just dusted, jerk?
(3) Also typical of northern dialects is the construction with the passive participle, which appears most often in an impersonal form, e.g.
The past participle of 'tendere' is 'tensus' which adverts to a situation of struggle.
"Participles are adjectives ending in 'ing' or 'ed.' [...] A participle phrase is a phrase that contains a participle and modifies the subject of the sentence.
These periphrases consist of a finite form (henceforth VFIN) of etre 'to be' or avoir 'to have' and a participle (henceforth PTCP).
The Principles of Chinese Participle Algorithm Design
Moreover, within this project, Sagemcom will participle in the Fair meter concept, which will help Enexis to contribute to sustainability in the energy sector.
The ordinal progression of categories arbitrary from the point of view of the developed software application nonetheless took into account the linguistic principles of natural morphology (the more common category precedes the less common one), diathetical derivation (passivization transform follows its reverse counterpart), part-of-speech succession (the noun proceeds the adjective and the adjective proceeds the lexicalized participle), derivational complexity (secondary derivatives attain larger ordinal labels than their primary deverbal motivators) or epidigmatic (sense building) complexity (factitive lexicalizations are a subclass of their same-word action counterparts).

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