party line

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party line

n.
1. One or more of the policies or principles of a political party to which loyal members are expected to adhere.
2. A telephone circuit connecting two or more subscribers with the same exchange.

party liner, par′ty-lin′er n.

party line

n
1. (Telecommunications) a telephone line serving two or more subscribers
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the policies or dogma of a political party, to which all members are expected to subscribe
3. (Law) chiefly US the boundary between adjoining property

par•ty line

(ˈpɑr ti ˈlaɪn for 1, 2; ˈpɑr ti ˌlaɪn for 3, 4)
n.
1. the authoritatively announced policies and practices of a group, esp. of the Communist Party.
2. the guiding policy, tenets, or practices of a political party: The delegates voted along party lines.
3. a telephone line connecting the telephones of a number of subscribers by one circuit to a central office.
4. the boundary line separating adjoining properties.
[1825–35, Amer.]
par′ty-line`, adj.
par′ty lin′er, n.

party line

The policies of a political party, or a particular policy, which loyal members are expected to support.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.party line - the policy of a political groupparty line - the policy of a political group; "He won in a vote along party lines"
policy - a line of argument rationalizing the course of action of a government; "they debated the policy or impolicy of the proposed legislation"
2.party line - a telephone line serving two or more subscribers
Translations

party line

n
a. (Pol) → linea del partito
b. (Telec) → duplex m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Prokofiev was at different times both an exile, spending many years in the United States and France, and a reluctant party-liner back home - so reluctant that in 1948 he, along with fellow composers Shostakovich and Khachaturian, was called to defend himself in front of a massed conference of mediocre Soviet composers.
That party-liners, platitude-peddlers, brown-nosers and bandwagon-jumpers, of which there are still far too many in racing (although there are some fine exceptions), stop profiting from their unprincipled opportunism.
That John Poindexter, convicted of lying to Congress, was to have headed the project seems to have scared even the most loyal of Republican party-liners.