pascal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pas·cal

 (pă-skăl′, pä-skäl′)
n.
1. Abbr. Pa A unit of pressure equal to one newton per square meter.
2. Pascal A programming language designed to support structured programming and used in teaching, applications, and systems programming.

[After Blaise Pascal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pascal

(French paskal)
n
(Biography) Blaise (blɛz). 1623–62, French philosopher, mathematician, and physicist. As a scientist, he made important contributions to hydraulics and the study of atmospheric pressure and, with Fermat, developed the theory of probability. His chief philosophical works are Lettres provinciales (1656–57), written in defence of Jansenism and against the Jesuits, and Pensées (1670), fragments of a Christian apologia

Pascal

(ˈpæsˌkæl; -kəl)
n
(Computer Science) a high-level computer programming language developed as a teaching language: used for general-purpose programming

pascal

(ˈpæskəl)
n
(Units) physics the derived SI unit of pressure; the pressure exerted on an area of 1 square metre by a force of 1 newton; equivalent to 10 dynes per square centimetre or 1.45 × 10–4 pound per square inch. Symbol: Pa
[C20: named after Blaise Pascal]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pas•cal

(pæˈskæl, pɑˈskɑl)

n.
the SI unit of pressure or stress, equal to one newton per square meter. Abbr.: Pa
[1955–60; after Blaise Pascal]

Pas•cal

(pæˈskæl)

n.
1. Blaise, 1623–62, French philosopher and mathematician.
2. Also, PASCAL a high-level computer language, a descendant of ALGOL, designed to facilitate structured programming.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pas·cal

(pă-skăl′, pä-skäl′)
A unit used to measure pressure. One pascal is equal to one newton per square meter.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pascal

1. The unit of pressure produced when one newton acts on about 1 sq m.
2. (Pa) A unit of pressure equal to the force of one newton acting over an area of one square meter.
3. A high-level, general-purpose programming language.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pascal - a unit of pressure equal to one newton per square meter
pressure unit - a unit measuring force per unit area
2.Pascal - French mathematician and philosopher and JansenistPascal - French mathematician and philosopher and Jansenist; invented an adding machine; contributed (with Fermat) to the theory of probability (1623-1662)
3.Pascal - a programing language designed to teach programming through a top-down modular approach
programing language, programming language - (computer science) a language designed for programming computers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
pascal
paskal
paskal
pascal

PASCAL

n (Comput) → PASCAL nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
He has said some things in Pascal's vein not unworthy of Pascal.
Pascal, from considerations to which Amiel was no stranger, came to the large hopes of the Catholic Church; Amiel stopped short at a faith almost hopeless; and by stopping short just there he really failed, as we think, of intellectual consistency, and missed that appeasing influence which his nature demanded as the condition of its full activity, as a force, an intellectual force, in the world--in the special business of his life.
The thought of Pascal's was brought home to him: "A MESURE QU'ON A PLUS D'ESPRIT, ON TROUVE QU'IL Y A PLUS D'HOMMES ORIGINAUX.
Dorothea knew many passages of Pascal's Pensees and of Jeremy Taylor by heart; and to her the destinies of mankind, seen by the light of Christianity, made the solicitudes of feminine fashion appear an occupation for Bedlam.
But he who dodges hospitals and jails, and walks fast crossing grave-yards, and would rather talk of operas than hell; calls Cowper, Young, Pascal, Rousseau, poor devils all of sick men; and throughout a care-free lifetime swears by Rabelais as passing wise, and therefore jolly; --not that man is fitted to sit down on tomb-stones, and break the green damp mould with unfathomably wondrous Solomon.
Some seconds of a Pascal or a Newton are more precious than the whole existence of a crowd of raw simpletons "
I know she was loaded with cotton, and that she took in her freight at Alexandria from Pastret's warehouse, and at Smyrna from Pascal's; that is all I was obliged to know, and I beg I may not be asked for any further particulars."
"I often wonder," Clarissa mused in bed, over the little white volume of Pascal which went with her everywhere, "whether it is really good for a woman to live with a man who is morally her superior, as Richard is mine.
Bixiou named Baudoyer, Godard, and Dutocq a "Trinity without the Spirit," and little La Billardiere the "Pascal Lamb."
"The Mandalorian" TV series is set five years after the events in the film "Return of the Jedi." The story follows Pascal's character, who is a gunfighter and a bounty hunter.
The three said the officers from Kayole police station, led by the deputy OCS, shot in the air and lobbed teargas canisters at the house, after Kaimenyi, Pascal's neighbour, reported they were playing loud music.