pasha

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pa·sha

also pa·cha  (pä′shə, păsh′ə, pə-shä′)
n.
Used formerly as a title for military and civil officers, especially in Turkey and northern Africa.

[Ottoman Turkish paşa (a title originally bestowed on a son of Osman I who did not succeed his father as sultan and on this son's descendants), perhaps ultimately from Middle Persian waččag, child (of unknown origin; for the semantic development of the Ottoman title, compare English childe and Spanish infante; see infante), or from alteration of Persian pādshāh; see Padishah.]

pasha

(ˈpɑːʃə; ˈpæʃə) or

pacha

n
(Historical Terms) (formerly) a provincial governor or other high official of the Ottoman Empire or the modern Egyptian kingdom: placed after a name when used as a title
[C17: from Turkish paşa]

pa•sha

(ˈpɑ ʃə, ˈpæʃ ə, pəˈʃɑ, -ˈʃɔ)

n., pl. -shas.
a former title placed after the name of high officials in countries under Turkish rule.
[1640–50; < Turkish paşa]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pasha - a civil or military authority in Turkey or Egyptpasha - a civil or military authority in Turkey or Egypt
authority - (usually plural) persons who exercise (administrative) control over others; "the authorities have issued a curfew"
Translations

pasha

[ˈpæʃə] Nbajá m, pachá m

pasha

nPascha m
References in classic literature ?
Livia settled all things for the succession of her son Tiberius, by continual giving out, that her husband Augustus was upon recovery and amendment, and it is an usual thing with the pashas, to conceal the death of the Great Turk from the janizaries and men of war, to save the sacking of Constantinople and other towns, as their manner is.
He was a tall, sunburnt, and very silent man, who wore a red smoking-cap like a fez, making him look like one of the English Sirdars or Pashas in Egypt.
Katia, Pasha," she added suddenly, seeing the servants at the door, "come here
Papoosh Pasha, the Turkish Ambassador (attended by Kibob Bey, dragoman of the mission), the Marquess of Steyne, Earl of Southdown, Sir Pitt and Lady Jane Crawley, Mr.
Some time after, it was stated that the Comte de Morcerf (this was the name he bore) had entered the service of Ali Pasha with the rank of instructor-general.