pashka


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pashka

(ˈpæʃkə)
n
(Cookery) a rich Russian dessert made of cottage cheese, cream, almonds, currants, etc, set in a special wooden mould and traditionally eaten at Easter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Third place was shared by Zeynab Mammadova and Tarana Makiyatdinova (Azerbaijan), Bianca Pashka and Antonel Botica (Romania).
Further into Eastern Europe, the pashka reigns supreme.
A savoury version of pashka exists in Poland and Eastern Germany, where the oldra, a big loaf stuffed with whole smoked sausages, is greatly enjoyed - I'm hoping with lots of sweet mustard.
She is surprised at the way in which Anton and Pashka are able to play using real weapons without hurting each other but still incurring an exciting degree of risk.
He recalls how in a game of throwing snowballs at a target, he and Pashka missed the target every time except the last when Pashka threw the snowball without aiming first.
In the epilogue, Pashka reflects on that childhood adventure as a way to understand what has happened to Anton in Arkanar: "The highway was anisotropic, like history.
This project rendered Pashka (or Pavlik, as the Soviet authorities would more genteelly rename him) an empty figure, susceptible to radical refashioning by different interest groups, at times falling out of circulation--when 'activist children' such as Pavlik gave way to 'silent children' of the late 1940s as models for emulation-then re-emerging more forcefully in ways that confound our received notions of Stalinist terror, the post-war period, and Thaw liberalism.
(5) For a brief discussion of some of Dunsany's other fictional critiques of violence, see Pashka.
(67) Helen Potrebenko, No Streets of Gold: A Social History of Ukrainians in Alberta (Vancouver 1977); Interview with Anna Pashka, September 1980.
Somewhere in the Russian countryside, gangly young Pashka (Roganov) is awakened from an erotic dream--or flash-forward--by the arrival of his boss Komov (Vladimir Bublikov) who tells him to pack his bags and go, since the family who owns the dasha is expected shortly.
Much of the above is only clarified by pic's catalogue entry, since what's on screen often seems like a baffling string of narrative non sequiturs, with no explanation given as to why Pashka plants the bomb, for example, or what motivates local shopkeeper Maria (Yana Galina) to ask him to dread her hair, or what the significance is of the river building site often seen in cutaway.
The study showed that the real Pavlik, who was not called Pavlik but Pashka, had nothing in common with the idealized image created by Soviet propagandists.