passé

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pas·sé

 (pă-sā′)
adj.
1. No longer current or in fashion; out-of-date.
2. Past the prime; faded or aged.

[French, past participle of passer, to pass, from Old French; see pass.]

passé

(ˈpɑːseɪ; ˈpɑseɪ; French pɑse)
adj
1. out-of-date: passé ideas.
2. past the prime; faded: a passé society beauty. Also (fem): passée
[C18: from French, past participle of passer to pass]

pas•sé

(pæˈseɪ)

adj.
1. old-fashioned; out-of-date; outmoded.
2. past one's prime.
[1765–75; < French, past participle of passer to pass]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.passe - out of fashionpasse - out of fashion; "a suit of rather antique appearance"; "demode (or outmoded) attire"; "outmoded ideas"
unfashionable, unstylish - not in accord with or not following current fashion; "unfashionable clothes"; "melodrama of a now unfashionable kind"

passé

adjective out-of-date, old-fashioned, dated, outdated, obsolete, unfashionable, antiquated, outmoded, old hat, outworn, unhip (slang), démodé (French) Punk rock is passé now.

passé

adjective
Translations

passé

[ˈpæseɪ] ADJpasado de moda

passé

[ˈpɑːseɪ] adj (= old hat) → dépassé(e)

passé

adjüberholt, passé (inf)

passé

[ˈpæseɪ] adjsorpassato/a, fuori moda
References in classic literature ?
Over Richard Wardour's face there passes the shadow of a deadly thought.
Besides, I wish such persons to observe that the grand artery and the arterial vein are of much harder and firmer texture than the venous artery and the hollow vein; and that the two last expand before entering the heart, and there form, as it were, two pouches denominated the auricles of the heart, which are composed of a substance similar to that of the heart itself; and that there is always more warmth in the heart than in any other part of the body- and finally, that this heat is capable of causing any drop of blood that passes into the cavities rapidly to expand and dilate, just as all liquors do when allowed to fall drop by drop into a highly heated vessel.
With regard to narrow passes, if you can occupy them first, let them be strongly garrisoned and await the advent of the enemy.
Very softly down the glade runs a waiting, watching shade, And the whisper spreads and widens far and near; And the sweat is on thy brow, for he passes even now-- He is Fear, O Little Hunter, he is Fear!
But the traveller, travelling through it, May not - dare not openly view it; Never its mysteries are exposed To the weak human eye unclosed; So wills its King, who hath forbid The uplifting of the fringed lid; And thus the sad Soul that here passes Beholds it but through darkened glasses.
He rises with the lark, passes the day in wholesome toil, and lies down at night to pleasant dreams.
On leaving Omaha, it passes along the left bank of the Platte River as far as the junction of its northern branch, follows its southern branch, crosses the Laramie territory and the Wahsatch Mountains, turns the Great Salt Lake, and reaches Salt Lake City, the Mormon capital, plunges into the Tuilla Valley, across the American Desert, Cedar and Humboldt Mountains, the Sierra Nevada, and descends, via Sacramento, to the Pacific--its grade, even on the Rocky Mountains, never exceeding one hundred and twelve feet to the mile.
The Indian trails were their safest guides, for though they sometimes appeared to lead them out of their direct course, they always conducted them to the passes.
After all, we have to conjure up ideal poets for ourselves out of those who stand in or behind the range of volumes on our book-shelves; and our ideal Browning would have for his entire structural type those two volumes of Men and Women with Pippa Passes.
At that instant the projectile will have no weight whatever; and, if it passes that point, it will fall into the moon by the sole effect of the lunar attraction.
Would you permit me to shut the door, sir, and will you further, sir, give me your honour bright, that what passes between us is in the strictest confidence?
All passes, all changes: the animosity of peoples, the handling of fleets, the forms of ships; and even the sea itself seems to wear a different and diminished aspect from the sea of Lord Nelson's day.