passed


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Related to passed: Passed Away, Passed tense

passed

gone beyond; happened: and so it passed; moved on; died: The old man has passed on.
Not to be confused with:
past – no longer current: the account is past due; formerly: a past president
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

pass

 (păs)
v. passed, pass·ing, pass·es
v.intr.
1. To move on or ahead; proceed: The train passed through fields of wheat.
2. To extend; run: The river passes through our land.
3.
a. To move by or in front of something: The band passed and the crowd cheered.
b. To move past another vehicle: The sports car passed on the right.
4. To gain passage despite obstacles: pass through difficult years.
5. To move past in time; elapse: The days passed quickly.
6.
a. To be transferred from one to another; circulate: The wine passed around the table.
b. Sports To transfer a ball or puck to a teammate.
7. To be communicated or exchanged between persons: Loud words passed in the corridor.
8. To be transferred or conveyed to another by will or deed: The title passed to the older heir.
9. To undergo transition from one condition, form, quality, or characteristic to another: Daylight passed into darkness.
10. To come to an end: My anger suddenly passed. The headache finally passed.
11. To cease to exist; die. Often used with on: The patient passed on during the night.
12. To happen; take place: wanted to know what had passed at the meeting.
13.
a. To be allowed to happen without notice or challenge: Let their rude remarks pass.
b. Sports & Games To decline one's turn to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
c. To decline an offer: When we offered him dessert, he passed.
14. To undergo an examination or a trial with favorable results.
15.
a. To serve as a barely acceptable substitute: The spare tire was nearly bald but would pass until we bought a new one.
b. To be accepted as a member of a group by denying one's own ancestry or background.
16. To be approved or adopted: The motion to adjourn passed.
17. Law
a. To make a decision: to pass upon a legal question.
b. To convey property to an heir or heirs: to pass according to the terms of the will.
18. Medicine To be discharged from a bodily part: The patient had a lot of pain when the kidney stone passed.
19. Sports To thrust or lunge in fencing.
v.tr.
1.
a. To go by without stopping; proceed beyond or leave behind: The bus passed a gas station.
b. To go across; go through: We passed the border into Mexico.
2. To allow to go by or elapse; spend: He passed his winter in Vermont.
3.
a. To go by without paying attention to; disregard or ignore: If you pass the new photographs in the collection, you'll miss some outstanding ones.
b. To fail to pay (a dividend).
4. To go beyond; surpass: The inheritance passed my wildest dreams.
5.
a. To undergo (a trial or examination) with favorable results: She passed every test.
b. To cause or allow to go through a trial, test, or examination successfully: The instructor passed all the candidates.
6.
a. To cause to move: We passed our hands over the fabric.
b. To cause to move into a certain position: pass a ribbon around a package.
c. To cause to move as part of a process: pass liquid through a filter.
d. To cause to go by: The sergeant passed his troops before the grandstand.
e. To allow to cross a barrier: The border guard passed the tourists.
f. Baseball To walk (a batter).
g. To maneuver (the bull) by means of a pase in bullfighting.
7.
a. To cause to be transferred from one to another; circulate: They passed the news quickly.
b. To hand over to someone else: Please pass the bread.
c. Sports To transfer (a ball, for example) to a teammate, as by throwing.
d. To cause to be accepted; circulate fraudulently: pass counterfeit money.
e. Law To convey (property) to an heir or heirs: to pass an estate.
8. Medicine To discharge (a waste product, for example) from a bodily part.
9. Medicine To introduce (an instrument) into a bodily cavity.
10.
a. To approve; adopt: The legislature passed the bill.
b. To be sanctioned, ratified, or approved by: The bill passed the House of Representatives.
11. To pronounce; utter: pass judgment; pass sentence on an offender.
n.
1. The act of passing; passage.
2. A way, such as a narrow gap between mountains, that affords passage around, over, or through a barrier.
3.
a. A permit, ticket, or authorization to come and go at will.
b. A free ticket entitling one to transportation or admission.
c. Written leave of absence from military duty.
d. A passing grade, especially when graded using a pass-fail grading system.
4.
a. A sweep or run, as by an aircraft, over or toward an area or target.
b. A single complete cycle of operations, as by a machine or computer program.
5. A condition or situation, often critical in nature; a predicament: contract negotiations that had come to an emotional pass.
6. A sexual invitation or overture: Was he making a pass at her?
7. A motion of the hand or the waving of a wand: The magician made a pass over the hat.
8.
a. Sports A transfer of a ball or puck between teammates.
b. Sports A lunge or thrust in fencing.
c. Baseball A base on balls.
9. Sports & Games A refusal to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
10. Games A winning throw of the dice in craps.
11. A pase in bullfighting.
Phrasal Verbs:
pass away
1. To pass out of existence; end.
2. To die.
pass for
To be accepted as or believed to be: You could pass for a teenager. The fake painting passed for an original.
pass off
1. To offer, sell, or put into circulation (an imitation) as genuine: pass off glass as a gemstone.
2. To present (one's self) as other than what one is: tried to pass himself off as a banker.
pass out
To lose consciousness.
pass over
To leave out; disregard.
pass up Informal
To let go by; reject: pass up a chance for promotion; an opportunity too good to pass up.
Idioms:
bring to pass
To cause to happen.
come to pass
To occur.
pass muster
To pass an examination or inspection; measure up to a given standard.
pass (one's) lips
1. To be eaten or drunk.
2. To issue or be spoken: Rumors never passed her lips.
pass the hat
To take up a collection of money.
pass the time of day
To exchange greetings or engage in pleasantries.
pass the torch
To relinquish (responsibilities, for example) to another or others.

[Middle English passen, from Old French passer, from Vulgar Latin passāre, from Latin passus, step; see pace1.]

pass′er n.
Usage Note: The past tense and past participle of pass is passed: They passed (or have passed) our home. Time had passed slowly. Past is the corresponding adjective (in centuries past), adverb (drove past), preposition (past midnight), and noun (lived in the past).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Neither entreaty nor courtly remonstrance came from the English prince; but Sir Hugh Calverley passed silently over the border with his company, and the blazing walls of the two cities of Miranda and Puenta de la Reyna warned the unfaithful monarch that there were other metals besides gold, and that he was dealing with a man to whom it was unsafe to lie.
I don't know whether I passed in it or not and I have a creepy, crawly presentiment that I didn't.
The one hundred and twenty miles between these cities were accomplished in six hours, and towards midnight, while fast asleep, the travellers passed through Sacramento; so that they saw nothing of that important place, the seat of the State government, with its fine quays, its broad streets, its noble hotels, squares, and churches.
From the description of inanimate bodies and plants, I passed to animals, and particularly to man.
Once or twice, with a queer, screeching sound, a shell, like a little puff of white smoke, passed high over the car and fell somewhere in the grey valley below.
To have followed the thern boat across the gleaming water would have been to invite instant detection, and so, though I was loath to permit Thurid to pass even for an instant beyond my sight, I was forced to wait in the shadows until the other boat had passed from my sight at the far extremity of the lake.
They were met by a deacon with a censer and by a servant who passed out on tiptoe without heeding them.
For a moment all hung in the balance, but before I touched him the guard stepped to one side, and I passed on out into the avenue.
In pleasant conversation of this sort they passed out of the tent into the wood, and the day was spent in visiting some of the posts and hiding-places, and then night closed in, not, however, as brilliantly or tranquilly as might have been expected at the season, for it was then midsummer; but bringing with it a kind of haze that greatly aided the project of the duke and duchess; and thus, as night began to fall, and a little after twilight set in, suddenly the whole wood on all four sides seemed to be on fire, and shortly after, here, there, on all sides, a vast number of trumpets and other military instruments were heard, as if several troops of cavalry were passing through the wood.
There appeared to be nobody stirring in that quarter of the town; the windows of the houses were all closely shut; and the streets through which they passed, were noiseless and empty.
And still the interminable procession came out of the obscurity to south and passed into the obscurity to north, with never a sound of voice, nor hoof, nor wheel.
There I found fat, and having plunged my hand in the fat, I wrapped it round with a skin and passed out again, for I could not stay still.