passionless

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pas·sion·less

 (păsh′ən-lĭs)
adj.
1. Lacking strong emotion or feeling: a rather passionless plea for clemency.
2. Unbiased or impartial; detached: a newspaper's passionless account of a sensational trial.

passionless

(ˈpæʃənlɪs)
adj
1. empty of emotion or feeling: a passionless marriage.
2. calm and detached; dispassionate
ˈpassionlessly adv
ˈpassionlessness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.passionless - not passionate; "passionless observation of human nature"
unemotional - unsusceptible to or destitute of or showing no emotion
unenthusiastic - not enthusiastic; lacking excitement or ardor; "an unenthusiastic performance by the orchestra"; "unenthusiastic applause"
cold - extended meanings; especially of psychological coldness; without human warmth or emotion; "a cold unfriendly nod"; "a cold and unaffectionate person"; "a cold impersonal manner"; "cold logic"; "the concert left me cold"
passionate - having or expressing strong emotions
2.passionless - unmoved by feeling; "he kept his emotionless objectivity and faith in the cause he served"; "this passionless girl was like an icicle in the sunshine"-Margaret Deland
cold - extended meanings; especially of psychological coldness; without human warmth or emotion; "a cold unfriendly nod"; "a cold and unaffectionate person"; "a cold impersonal manner"; "cold logic"; "the concert left me cold"

passionless

passionless

adjective
Deficient in or lacking sexual desire:
Translations

passionless

[ˈpæʃənlɪs] ADJ [relationship] → sin pasión, frío
References in classic literature ?
Meantime while his whole attention was absorbed, the Parsee was kneeling beneath him on the ship's deck, and with face thrown up like Ahab's, was eyeing the same sun with him; only the lids of his eyes half hooded their orbs, and his wild face was subdued to an earthly passionlessness.
The image of the passionless lady produced a dark counterpart in the fallen whore; any woman who did not rise to the standard of passionlessness became a fit subject for exploitation.
The reader then suspects that the speaker's lack of excitement about her lover's return is not due to modesty or passionlessness (which one might expect from a shy Victorian maiden) but because she had loved so laboriously, painfully, and unrequitedly for so long, that now she is simply exhausted and incapable of mustering the expected response.
8] Accordingly, historians have read escaped nuns tales and their stories of sexual violence as narratives of sexual danger that warned young women against violating the tenets of Protestant domesticity, especially its dictates of sexual passionlessness.
Christina Simmons begins by explaining the ideology of nineteenth-century marriage, with its emphasis on separate spheres for males and females, female passionlessness, and individual self-restraint in the service of a larger moral order.
Further, they could relate to white men in many of the same ways that refined white women could without the burden of passionlessness to regulate those encounters.
For example, they contrasted the passionlessness of middle-class women to the lustful, adulterous promiscuity and prostitution evident among lower-class women, who might be subjected to reformer benevolence or written off as incorrigibles.
Her reflections on her insomniac excursions, the likelihood of her having an affair, or the unmotivated possibility of having her breasts removed are delivered with clinical detachment but reveal the melancholia of passionlessness.
Moreover, it should be emphasized that female passionlessness was an ideological prescription of the bourgeoisie, not a social reality.