pate


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pate

 (pāt)
n.
1. The human head, especially the top of the head: a bald pate.
2. The mind or brain.

[Middle English.]

pat′ed (pā′tĭd) adj.

pâte

 (pät)
n.
See paste1.

[French, from Old French paste, paste; see paste1.]

pâ·té

 (pä-tā′)
n.
1.
a. A meat paste, such as pâté de foie gras.
b. A similar paste made of seasoned vegetables.
2. A small pastry filled with meat or fish.

[French, from Old French paste, paste, pâté; see paste1.]

pate

(peɪt)
n
(Anatomy) the head, esp with reference to baldness or (in facetious use) intelligence
[C14: of unknown origin]

pâté

(ˈpæteɪ; French pɑte)
n
1. (Cookery) a spread of very finely minced liver, poultry, etc, served usually as an hors d'oeuvre
2. (Cookery) a savoury pie of meat or fish
[from French: paste1]

pate

(peɪt)

n.
1. the crown of the head.
2. the head.
3. the brain.
[1275–1325; Middle English, of uncertain orig.]

pâ•té

(pɑˈteɪ, pæ-)

n., pl. -tés.
a paste of puréed or chopped meat, liver, game, etc., usu. served as an appetizer.
[1695–1705; < French; see paste, -ee]

pâté

A French word meaning paste, used to mean a savory paste.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pate - liver or meat or fowl finely minced or ground and variously seasonedpate - liver or meat or fowl finely minced or ground and variously seasoned
paste, spread - a tasty mixture to be spread on bread or crackers or used in preparing other dishes
duck pate - a pate made from duck liver
foie gras, pate de foie gras - a pate made from goose liver (marinated in Cognac) and truffles
2.pate - the top of the head
human head - the head of a human being
tonsure - the shaved crown of a monk's or priest's head
top side, upper side, upside, top - the highest or uppermost side of anything; "put your books on top of the desk"; "only the top side of the box was painted"

pate

noun
The uppermost part of the body:
Translations
paštika
päälaki
פטה
pástétommájkrém stb
pašteta
паштета
paté
ba tê

pate

(o.f.) [peɪt] Nmollera f, testa f
bald patecalva f

pâté

[ˈpæteɪ] Npaté m

pate

[ˈpeɪt] n
a bald pate → un crâne chauve, un crâne dégarni

pâté

[ˈpæteɪ] npâté m, terrine f

pate

nRübe f (inf), → Birne f (inf); bald patePlatte f (inf), → Glatze f

pâté

nPastete f

pate

[peɪt] n a bald pateuna testa pelata

pâté

[ˈpæteɪ] npâté m inv
References in classic literature ?
They had told him to hope for it, but had not told him what was to be hidden in the mysterious pate. And what friends awaited him without?
A Fly came up and kept buzzing about his bald pate, and stinging him from time to time.
Having provided everything necessary for our journey, such as Arabian habits, and red caps, calicoes, and other trifles to make presents of to the inhabitants, and taking leave of our friends, as men going to a speedy death, for we were not insensible of the dangers we were likely to encounter, amongst horrid deserts, impassable mountains, and barbarous nations, we left Goa on the 26th day of January in the year 1624, in a Portuguese galliot that was ordered to set us ashore at Pate, where we landed without any disaster in eleven days, together with a young Abyssin, whom we made use of as our interpreter.
Now by the bright eyes of Nan o' the Mill, and by mine own name and that's Wat o' the Crabstaff, and by mine own mother's son, and that's myself, will I, even I, Wat o' the Crabstaff, meet this same sturdy rogue, and gin he mind not the seal of our glorious sovereign King Harry, and the warrant of the good Sheriff of Nottinghamshire, I will so bruise, beat, and bemaul his pate that he shall never move finger or toe again!
In like manner I apprehend, some future historian (if any one shall do me the honour of imitating my manner) will, after much scratching his pate, bestow some good wishes on my memory, for having first established these several initial chapters; most of which, like modern prologues, may as properly be prefixed to any other book in this history as to that which they introduce, or indeed to any other history as to this.
``Get thine iron pot on thy head then, friend Sluggard, as quickly as thy nature will permit,'' said the hermit, ``while I remove these pewter flagons, whose late contents run strangely in mine own pate; and to drown the clatter for, in faith, I feel somewhat unsteady strike into the tune which thou hearest me sing; it is no matter for the words I scarce know them myself.''
As to him - I soon learned to regret I was not some object, some beautiful, carved object of bone or bronze; a rare piece of porcelain, pate dure, not pate tendre.
Meanwhile Don Quixote worked upon a farm labourer, a neighbour of his, an honest man (if indeed that title can be given to him who is poor), but with very little wit in his pate. In a word, he so talked him over, and with such persuasions and promises, that the poor clown made up his mind to sally forth with him and serve him as esquire.
It was an old man that made his way alone through the gloomy jungle, a wrinkled, dried up, little old man hideously scarred and tattooed and strangely garbed, with the skin of a hyena about his shoulders and the dried head mounted upon his grey pate. Tarzan recognized the ear-marks of the witch-doctor and awaited Numa's charge with a feeling of pleasurable anticipation, for the ape-man had no love for witch-doctors; but in the instant that Numa did charge, the white man suddenly recalled that the lion had stolen his kill a few minutes before and that revenge is sweet.
On one side of the volume was painted a bottle; on the reverse a pate. On the back were visible in large letters Oeuvres de Bon-Bon.
I had as lief have the castle drawbridge drop upon my pate."
CURSED BE HE THAT STRUCK FRIAR SANDELO A BLOW ON THE PATE! maledicat Dominus!