paternalistic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pa·ter·nal·ism

 (pə-tûr′nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
A policy or practice of treating or governing people in a fatherly manner, especially by providing for their needs without giving them rights or responsibilities.

pa·ter′nal·ist adj. & n.
pa·ter′nal·is′tic adj.
pa·ter′nal·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.paternalistic - benevolent but sometimes intrusive
paternal - characteristic of a father
Translations

paternalistic

[pəˌtɜːnəˈlɪstɪk] ADJpaternalista

paternalistic

[pəˌtɜːrnəˈlɪstɪk] adj [employer] → paternaliste
References in periodicals archive ?
As the concept is usually understood, a policy counts as paternalistic if it is justified on the belief that it will make a person better off than if the person had been left to choose between the available options for him or herself.
Paternalistic plan sponsors are more likely to offer a match and automatic plan features-and often a higher match and more features-than other plans.
In recent years, teachers' cognition in relation to paternalistic leadership behavior has drawn an increasing amount of attention from Chinese scholars and practitioners (see e.
Milton Friedman wrote that "the paternalistic ground for government activity is in many ways the most troublesome to a liberal; for it involves the acceptance of a principle--that some shall decide for others--which he finds objectionable in most applications.
That an action, a law, or a policy is paternalistic generally counts against it.
One is that nudging by shaming can be either paternalistic or non-paternalistic and that, like any intervention, it is easier to justify when it is nonpaternalistic.
Welfare reform policies in Australia that aim to assist jobless people into employment exhibit paternalistic characteristics.
The nation-state system that took root in the region in the aftermath of World War I enabled the consolidation of paternalistic centralized states, but failed to provide for societal checks and balances.
Kelly explained that people tend to appoint in their own image, as it's a tendency of men to support other, younger men and feel paternalistic towards them.
Paternalistic Leadership is characterized by a patriarchal and hierarchical authoritarian style of management.
Rhian Davies, chief executive of Disability Wales, said attitudes towards disabled people had been "quite paternalistic and welfare-orientated" so they were seen as "recipients of social services and benefits rather than as employees and managers".
From the founding of the company as a paternalistic entity, through the growth of a community around the plant, the author (history and Social Sciences, Gardner-Webb University) demonstrates the trade-offs between personal freedom and the sense of collective identity that had emerged among the workers at the plant.