pathetic fallacy


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pathetic fallacy

n.
The attribution of human emotions or characteristics to inanimate objects or to nature; for example, angry clouds; a cruel wind.

pathetic fallacy

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in literature) the presentation of inanimate objects in nature as possessing human feelings

pathet′ic fal′lacy


n.
the endowment of nature, inanimate objects, etc., with human traits and feelings, as in the smiling skies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pathetic fallacy - the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects; `the friendly sun' is an example of the pathetic fallacy
fallacy, false belief - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
References in periodicals archive ?
The end point of that trajectory is his great realist manifesto, "Of the Pathetic Fallacy," premised on an irreducible moral relation between self and other.
Both are examples of the universally used pathetic fallacy.
There is a decidedly Foucauldian ring to these drawings, with the artist also paying homage to Goya's black paintings and etchings, Indian filmmaker Ritwik Ghatak's movie Ajantrik (The Pathetic Fallacy, 1958), and Sergei Eisenstein's Ivan the Terrible (1944 and 1958).
The use of pathetic fallacy pervades this narrative, but it is elevated to the sublime as early as the opening paragraph with the (adult) narrator's invocation of Thomas Bewick: the child Jane reads Bewick's description of the Arctic Zone, "the accumulation of centuries of winters" (29), the imagery of this harsh landscape perfectly encapsulating her own desolate childhood.
She expends much effort to capture the gruff language of farmers and exults in nature and pathetic fallacy, finding a simile for her human protagonists' every awkward feeling in the actions of an animal or the weather.
20) Most of them end up in psychoanalysis, made to prove another theory of traumatic omission, be it the return of the repressed (Day) or the melancholic compulsion (Auden) or the pathetic fallacy (Armstrong and Tucker).
This at least I know to be a mistake: an instance of the pathetic fallacy (angry cloud, proud mountain, presumptuous little Beaujolais) by which we ascribe animate qualities to inanimate phenomena.
Here, the pathetic fallacy doubles as, or finds its verity in, the identification of the future persons who will witness similar seeings and hearings and who are therefore already, in Whitman's now, inside the things they will see later, all of this functioning also as an assertion of the continuity, the beadedness of such perceptual encounters with the world.
These descriptions obviously indulge the pathetic fallacy, a hallmark of traditional nature poetry that ecopoetics has striven to rethink because of its anthropocentrism.
Seton's tendency to incorporate the pathetic fallacy into his descriptions of animals at first seems at odds with Errington's sound biological principles.
Her writing is poetic -- she thrives especially on pathetic fallacy -- and, as one might expect from someone who conceives such a memorable literary conceit as the sand fish, imaginatively vivid.