pathetic fallacy


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pathetic fallacy

n.
The attribution of human emotions or characteristics to inanimate objects or to nature; for example, angry clouds; a cruel wind.

pathetic fallacy

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in literature) the presentation of inanimate objects in nature as possessing human feelings

pathet′ic fal′lacy


n.
the endowment of nature, inanimate objects, etc., with human traits and feelings, as in the smiling skies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pathetic fallacy - the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects; `the friendly sun' is an example of the pathetic fallacy
fallacy, false belief - a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout this critical history, the charge of egotism or subjectivism has been closely allied with the idea that Wordsworth is preeminently a poet guilty of what John Ruskin termed the pathetic fallacy. Not only does he impose his interpretation on things that would otherwise tell for themselves, as Hazlitt gripes; he habitually misperceives things to begin with by projecting his own thoughts and feelings onto them.
Our present university courses in this field embody a pathetic fallacy, and are anything but scientific in any sense.
Annie is "the freak, the weirdo, the angel-faced kid with a heart of darkness," says Bill, convoluted dialogue with a morbid-Goth kick being a major part of this movie (he also corrects her grammar, and explains the literary convention known as the 'pathetic fallacy').
'What a pathetic fallacy! Chief Obasanjo never met any Labour man or woman on May 1, 2018, to make any supposed volte-face to support Buhari.
The pathetic fallacy is a mental error in which people ascribe human feelings or thoughts to inanimate objects.
THIS ESSAY RELATES RUSKIN'S "PATHETIC FALLACY" for the first time to his theory of the ideal as it develops in the course of the early volumes of Modern Painters.
Both are examples of the universally used pathetic fallacy.
These drawings have been created as image fragments made visible by its sweeping light." There is a decidedly Foucauldian ring to these drawings, with the artist also paying homage to Goya's black paintings and etchings, Indian filmmaker Ritwik Ghatak's movie Ajantrik (The Pathetic Fallacy, 1958), and Sergei Eisenstein's Ivan the Terrible (1944 and 1958).
The use of pathetic fallacy pervades this narrative, but it is elevated to the sublime as early as the opening paragraph with the (adult) narrator's invocation of Thomas Bewick: the child Jane reads Bewick's description of the Arctic Zone, "the accumulation of centuries of winters" (29), the imagery of this harsh landscape perfectly encapsulating her own desolate childhood.
She expends much effort to capture the gruff language of farmers and exults in nature and pathetic fallacy, finding a simile for her human protagonists' every awkward feeling in the actions of an animal or the weather.
searching for pathetic fallacy. The wall clock struggles to keep me
He ventures out despite the rain (early encounter with pathetic fallacy!) and his life changes when he finds a little lost dog attached to a red lead.