patriate


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Related to patriate: expatriate

patriate

(ˈpætrɪˌeɪt; ˈpeɪtrɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
to bring under the authority of an autonomous country, for example as in the transfer of the Canadian constitution from UK to Canadian responsibility
ˌpatriˈation n

pa•tri•ate

(ˈpeɪ triˌeɪt; esp. Brit. ˈpæ-)
v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing. Canadian.
to transfer (legislation) to the authority of an autonomous country from its previous mother country.
[1965–70; back formation from repatriate]
pa`tri•a′tion, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
On October 1, 1980, the day before he planned to make public his intention to patriate the Constitution without the approval of the provinces, Trudeau had a lengthy conversation with Ed Broadbent.
In Volume 2 he says the USA "means nothing to me" (395), a sentiment that would reappear, at least implicitly, in a prefix: he calls himself an "ex patriate" (445) there to "get a belly full of D'america" and go back (449).
AbdulAziz Al Ghurair, Chairman of The UAE Banks Federation dampened hopes for the imminency of a potential individual bankruptcy law, saying that a possible law would be "suicidal for the UAE" if there is not an agreement with the ex patriate's home countries.
This gap, in fact, became the main stimulus for Canada's decades-long efforts to patriate its constitution.
Its characters and plot are well-known: the charismatic Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, determined to entrench constitutional protection of language rights; the acrimonious battle between the federal and provincial governments; the federal attempt to patriate the constitution unilaterally; the late-night drafting of the "Kitchen Accord", which, in Quebec, has become known as the "Night of the Long Knives".
On constitutional issues his court ruled on Trudeau's move to patriate the constitution unilaterally without the provinces.
(International sales: Rex patriate, Prague.) Produced by Nancy Bishop, Tony Laue.
During closed debate among the provincial premiers and the prime minister to patriate the Canadian Constitution, former premier David Peterson of Ontario informed the press that writing the constitution was like making sausages--not something the public would enjoy witnessing first-hand.
Bourassa had been a leader in forming a common front of provincial opposition to Prime Minister Trudeau's plans to patriate (bring home) the Constitution.
Canadians did not become embroiled in constitutional politics until after World War II, when federal politicians--French as well as English--moved by a sense of Canadian nationalism, became determined to terminate Canada's constitutional colonialism and 'patriate' the country's Constitution.
The Supreme Court facilitated this attempt by ruling, in The Patriation Reference [1981], that only a "substantial degree" of provincial consent was required to patriate the constitution and bind the governments of Canada to abide by the Charter.(28) In November 1981, Trudeau achieved the substantial agreement he needed by hammering out a compromise with the leaders of the nine other provinces.(29) Many people in Quebec view this agreement as a betrayal, referring to the evening the compromise was reached as "the night of the long knives." Despite the Quebec National Assembly's vote against ratification, Quebeckers were unable to stop the Charter from being imposed upon them.