patrilineal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

pat·ri·lin·e·al

 (păt′rə-lĭn′ē-əl)
adj.
Relating to, based on, or tracing ancestral descent through the paternal line.

patrilineal

(ˌpætrɪˈlɪnɪəl) or

patrilinear

adj
(Anthropology & Ethnology) tracing descent, kinship, or title through the male line
ˌpatriˈlineally, ˌpatriˈlinearly adv

pat•ri•lin•e•al

(ˌpæ trəˈlɪn i əl, ˌpeɪ-)

also pat`ri•lin′e•ar,



adj.
tracing, signifying, or based upon descent through the male line.
Compare matrilineal.
[1900–05]
pat`ri•lin′e•al•ly, adv.
pat′ri•li`ny (-ˌlaɪ ni) n.

patrilineal

1. Used to describe a society in which descent is traced through men.
2. Tracing descent through the father’s line.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.patrilineal - based on or tracing descent through the male line; "a patrilineal society"
lineal, direct - in a straight unbroken line of descent from parent to child; "lineal ancestors"; "lineal heirs"; "a direct descendant of the king"; "direct heredity"
Translations

pat·ri·lin·e·al

a. de descendencia paterna; rel. a rasgos heredados del padre.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nana Adu Gyamfi was emphatic that Behenase Stool is a patrilineal stool, which means only royals from patrilineal lineage qualify to be chiefs, but some people want to change the status quo, thereby allowing those from matrilineal lineage to lobby for the stool, which is not even vacant in the first place, an aberration, they said, is threatening the security of the Behenase community .
The stranger next to me had no way of knowing all that it had taken me, a half-Jewish, patrilineal, now-Unitarian, to become a regular participant in Friday night services.
At this point in time, a few things that we know about namesaking are that boys are namesaked more often than girls (Johnson, et al., 1991; McAndrew, King, & Honoroff, 2002; Rabinovich, 1994), and that patrilineal namesaking is more common than matrilineal namesaking, especially for boys (Brown, Carvallo, & Imura, 2014; McAndrew et al., 2002).
"The Soul of Judaism" offers the first exploration of the full diversity of Black Jews, including bi-racial Jews of both matrilineal and patrilineal descent; adoptees; black converts to Judaism; and Black Hebrews and Israelites, who trace their Jewish roots to Africa and challenge the dominant western paradigm of Jews as white and of European descent.
Irene Eber explores their identity, highlights their patrilineal structure, and contends that Judeo-Confucian syncretism has prompted the Chinese Jews to absorb Confucian cultural elements.
Our study begins to disentangle patrilocal, patrilineal, and general gender attitudes to examine how these parental gender attitudes are transmitted to their children as cultural capital and how these attitudes and behaviors may be converted to higher educational attainment levels for girls and boys.
Christianity, Colonization, and Gender Relations in North Sumatra: A Patrilineal Society in Flux
Masters of Empire is a native-centered history in which McDonnell explains that the patrilineal doodemags of the region framed a flexible kinship system in which both trade and exogamous marriage practices operated to make it possible for indigenous communities to incorporate outsiders into native kinship systems (11, 93).
Notions of inheritance thought the father trumped traditional Cherokee matrilineal inheritance for a patrilineal system.
In Lebanon and Jordan, generations of mothers have come up against patrilineal nationality laws which have forced countless children into statelessness.
In patrilineal societies such as Kurdistan, identity is conferred through the "male" head of the family or tribe, while women are denigrated.
Inheritance of country is far from exhausted by patrilineal descent, but the latter is arguably the primary mode of identification with estates throughout the continent--even in the Western Desert, where it is writ small and the ideal target of matching 'descent from father' and 'belonging to country' (Hamilton 1982) is usually too difficult to reach (Sutton 2007; and see Peterson 1986:59).