patrology


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Related to patrology: petrology

patrology

(pəˈtrɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the study of the writings of the Fathers of the Church
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a collection of such writings
[C17: from Greek patr-, patēr father + -logy]
patrological adj
paˈtrologist n

patrology

1. Also patristics. the branch of theology that studies the teachings of the early church fathers.
2. a collection of the writings of the early church fathers. — patrologist, n.patrologic, patrological, adj.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patrology - the writings of the early Church Fathers
writing - (usually plural) the collected work of an author; "the idea occurs with increasing frequency in Hemingway's writings"
2.patrology - the study of the lives, writings, and doctrines of the Church Fathers
Christian theology - the teachings of Christian churches
Translations
Patrologie
References in periodicals archive ?
The patrologist Johannes Quasten, in his handbook of Patrology, states that only one of the three Cappadocian Fathers was given the name the Great, St.
(1) For more details regarding his life, writings, and doctrine, see Johannes Quasten, Patrology, vol.
"Late Patrology: The Example of Giorgio Agamben." Toronto Journal of Theology 29.1 (2013): 3-18.
I studied from 2003 to 2008 at the Capuchin seminary [in Addis Ababa], then I went to Italy for three years to do my master's in patrology or patristics [study of early church fathers and their writings of the church].
Throughout the span of his long career in monastic life he filled many posts: organist, abbot's secretary, enrollment secretary, choir master, guest master, retreat master, archivist, professor of history, patrology, philosophy and scripture, claustral prior, counselor to the order's Abbot General in Rome for English speaking monasteries in North and South America and English/French, French/English translator at its international General Chapter meetings.The last living link to the earliest history of the Trappists in North America, Father Laurence's formative years were cultivated by monastic elders who had lived and prayed in the original 1825 foundation of Petit Clairvaux in Tracadie, Nova Scotia.
chiefly to scripture and patrology. For these "Ressourcement"
It acquired an antipathy to both, through which it tended to an exclusive reliance on patrology. Staniloae's work releases it from these bonds, making use of what he calls by the unfamiliar term "open subornicity." By that he means an openness to learn from Western theologies, Catholic or Protestant, without corrupting the patristic resources of Orthodox theology.
distinguishes between the terms "patrology" and "patristics": the former is associated with the philological study of the literary legacy of the first centuries of the church, in light of their cultural and historical context; the latter, first used by Lutheran theologians in the seventeenth century, indicates "that branch of theological teaching that had to systematize the teaching of the Church Fathers" (21).
3371-3374; Johannes QUASTEN, Patrology III, Utrech, 1963, pp.
Newer equivalents of Quaesten's Patrology, or even Lietzmann's Geschichte der alten Kirche, have not appeared, and this is partly a reflection of the diversification of the field of early Christian studies.
Augustinian Patristic Institute-Rome, Patrology IV,, Westminster-Maryland 1986.
Godet writes that Eusebius "was confined in turn in Palestine, at Scythopolis, where the Arian bishop Patrophilus himself was his jailer and treated him quite roughly." (35) Manlio Simonetti's entry on Eusebius in Johannes Quasten's Patrology indicates that Eusebius was "being held virtually prisoner by Patrophilus." (36) Dattrino calls attention to Eusebius's "forced solitude." (37) The exiles Eusebius and Lucifer "were thus completely isolated from the outside world and, in large part, deprived of visitation from their friends and fellows," reckons Goemans.