patron


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pa·tron

 (pā′trən)
n.
1. One that supports, protects, or champions someone or something, such as an institution, event, or cause; a sponsor or benefactor: a patron of the arts.
2. A customer, especially a regular customer.
3. (also pä-trōn′) The owner or manager of an establishment, especially a restaurant or an inn of France or Spain.
4.
a. A noble or wealthy person in ancient Rome who granted favor and protection to someone in exchange for certain services.
b. A slave owner in ancient Rome who freed a slave without relinquishing all legal claim to him.
5. One who possesses the right to grant an ecclesiastical benefice to a member of the clergy.
6. A patron saint.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin patrōnus, from Latin, from pater, patr-, father; see pəter- in Indo-European roots.]

pa′tron·al (pā′trə-nəl) adj.

patron

(ˈpeɪtrən)
n
1. a person, esp a man, who sponsors or aids artists, charities, etc; protector or benefactor
2. (Commerce) a customer of a shop, hotel, etc, esp a regular one
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) See patron saint
4. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) the protector of a dependant or client, often the former master of a freedman still retaining certain rights over him
5. (Anglicanism) Christianity a person or body having the right to present a clergyman to a benefice
[C14: via Old French from Latin patrōnus protector, from pater father]
patronal adj
ˈpatronly adj

patron

(patrɔ̃)
n
(Commerce) a man, who owns or manages a hotel, restaurant, or bar

patron

(ˈpætərn)
n
Irish a variant spelling of pattern2

pa•tron

(ˈpeɪ trən)

n.
1. a person who is a customer, client, or paying guest, esp. a regular one, of a store, hotel, or the like.
2. a person who supports with money, efforts, or endorsement an artist, charity, etc.
4. (in ancient Rome)
a. the protector of a dependent or client.
b. the former master of a freedman still retaining some rights over him.
5. a person who has the right of presenting a member of the clergy to a benefice.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Medieval Latin, Latin patrōnus legal protector, advocate (Medieval Latin: lord, master), derivative of pater father]
pa′tron•ly, adj.

patron

- Derives from Latin patronus, which means "protector of clients" or "defender."
See also related terms for protected.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patron - a regular customerpatron - a regular customer      
customer, client - someone who pays for goods or services
operagoer - a patron of the opera
habitue, regular, fixture - a regular patron; "an habitue of the racetrack"; "a bum who is a Central Park fixture"
2.patron - the proprietor of an inn
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
innkeeper, boniface, host - the owner or manager of an inn
owner, proprietor - (law) someone who owns (is legal possessor of) a business; "he is the owner of a chain of restaurants"
3.patron - someone who supports or champions somethingpatron - someone who supports or champions something
benefactor, helper - a person who helps people or institutions (especially with financial help)
backer, angel - invests in a theatrical production
godfather - someone having a relation analogous to that of a male sponsor to his godchild
godparent - a person who sponsors someone (the godchild) at baptism
guarantor, warranter, warrantor, surety - one who provides a warrant or guarantee to another
patroness, patronne - a woman who is a patron or the wife of a patron
pillar of strength, tower of strength - a person who can be relied on to give a great deal of support and comfort

patron

noun
1. supporter, friend, champion, defender, sponsor, guardian, angel (informal), advocate, backer, helper, protagonist, protector, benefactor, philanthropist Catherine the Great was a patron of the arts and sciences.
2. customer, client, buyer, frequenter, shopper, habitué Like so many of its patrons, he could not resist the food at the Savoy.

patron

noun
1. A person who supports or champions an activity, cause, or institution, for example:
Informal: angel.
2. One who buys goods or services:
Translations
زُبوننَصير، مُشَجِّع
ага
mecenášstálý zákazník
fast kundemæcenprotektorsponsor
asiakaskannattajakanta-asiakasmesenaattirakennuttaja
állandó vevõvédnök
fastagestur, fastur viîskiptavinurvelunnari, stuîningsmaîur
globėjiškai elgtis sumecenatasnuolat lankytinuolatinis klientaspatronas
pastāvīgs klientspatrons, mecenāts, atbalstītājs
mecenáš
devamlı müşterikoruyucu

patron

[ˈpeɪtrən]
A. N [of charity, society] → patrocinador(a) m/f (Comm) [of shop, hotel] → cliente/a m/f
a patron of the artsun mecenas
B. CPD patron saint Npatrono/a m/f

patron

[ˈpeɪtrən] n
[pub, shop] → client(e) m/f
[charity] → patron(ne) m/f patron of the arts

patron

n (= customer of shop)Kunde m, → Kundin f; (= customer of restaurant, hotel)Gast m; (of society)Schirmherr(in) m(f); (of artist)Förderer m, → Förderin f, → Gönner(in) m(f); (= patron saint)Schutzpatron(in) m(f); patrons onlynur für Kunden/Gäste; patron of the artsKunstmäzen(in) m(f); our patrons (of shop)unsere Kundschaft

patron

[ˈpeɪtrn] n (of artist) → mecenate m/f; (of charity) → benefattore/trice; (of society) → patrono/essa; (of shop, hotel) → cliente m/f abituale
patron of the arts → mecenate m/f

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in classic literature ?
As my new patron, or master, had taken me home to his house, so I was in hopes that he would take me with him when he went to sea again, believing that it would some time or other be his fate to be taken by a Spanish or Portugal man-of-war; and that then I should be set at liberty.
The next morning going on deck, as he always did at an early hour, the patron found Dantes leaning against the bulwarks gazing with intense earnestness at a pile of granite rocks, which the rising sun tinged with rosy light.
Hugh with a muttered oath thrust his hand into his breast, and drawing the bracelet forth, wrapped in a scrap of hay, was about to lay it on the table likewise, when his patron stopped his hand and bade him put it up again.
If Mr Tom Noakes gives his five shillings ain't he a Patron, and if Mrs Jack Styles gives her five shillings ain't she a Patroness?
But although he gained this by his writing, it was not because the people liked his books, but because one man liked them or was eager to have his name upon them, and therefore became his patron.
The matter is, monseigneur," replied the patron of the bark, "that it is a truly remarkable thing - that lighter comes along like a hurricane.
The company might have had other engagements, or they might have felt their inferiority, but in any case they dispersed by degrees, and not being replaced by other company, left their new patron in possession of the Break of Day.
A very strong instance of which I shall give you in this address, in which I am determined to follow the example of all other dedicators, and will consider not what my patron really deserves to have written, but what he will be best pleased to read.
The Sheriff should swear by his patron saint that he will not molest us," said Will Stutely; and his addition was carried unanimously.
And, taking from her pocket a rather greasy porte-monnaie, she extracted from it a small glazed visiting card, and presented the latter to her patron.
Downright English am I, Sir Knight, and downright English was my patron St Dunstan, and scorned oc and oui, as he would have scorned the parings of the devil's hoof downright English alone shall be sung in this cell.
Born in the province of Ssuch`uan, Li Po obtained his doctor's degree at the age of twenty, and was already known as a brilliant, inspired poet before Ming Huang became his patron in the capital.