patron saint


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patron saint

n.
A saint who is regarded as the intercessor and advocate in heaven for a nation, place, craft, activity, class, or person.

patron saint

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a saint regarded as the particular guardian of a country, church, trade, person, etc

pa′tron saint′


n.
a saint regarded as the special guardian of a person, group, trade, country, etc.
[1710–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patron saint - a saint who is considered to be a defender of some group or nationpatron saint - a saint who is considered to be a defender of some group or nation
defender, guardian, protector, shielder - a person who cares for persons or property
saint - a person who has died and has been declared a saint by canonization
Translations
شَفيع
-kapatron
skytshelgen
saint patron
védõszentvédőszent
verndardÿrlingur
patrón
koruyucu aziz

patron saint

n (of church etc)Schutzpatron(in) m(f), → Schutzheilige(r) mf

patron saint

npatrono/a

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in classic literature ?
The Sheriff should swear by his patron saint that he will not molest us," said Will Stutely; and his addition was carried unanimously.
Don Quixote laughed, and asked them to take off the next cloth, underneath which was seen the image of the patron saint of the Spains seated on horseback, his sword stained with blood, trampling on Moors and treading heads underfoot; and on seeing it Don Quixote exclaimed, "Ay, this is a knight, and of the squadrons of Christ
Monk, if he had the good faith of the Puritans, his allies, must have returned fervent thanks to the patron saint who had taken him from the box of M.
Each guild had its patron saint, and after a time the members of a guild began to act a play on their saint's day in his honor.
Why didst thou not keep a still tongue in thy head and let his patron saint look after the welfare of this princeling?
Besides, I swear by my patron saint, that she is far inferior to the lovely Saxon, Rowena.
Then thou mayst go thy ways; and thank thy patron saint that I am a merciful man," said the Tanner.
I was sworn by my patron saint, and faithfully did I keep the vow, until the man they call Ishmael forgot the terms by offering violence.
Ogg, the patron saint of this ancient town, of whose history I possess several manuscript versions.
No, I ain't, sir,' replied the fat boy, starting up from a remote corner, where, like the patron saint of fat boys--the immortal Horner--he had been devouring a Christmas pie, though not with the coolness and deliberation which characterised that young gentleman's proceedings.
Guster, really aged three or four and twenty, but looking a round ten years older, goes cheap with this unaccountable drawback of fits, and is so apprehensive of being returned on the hands of her patron saint that except when she is found with her head in the pail, or the sink, or the copper, or the dinner, or anything else that happens to be near her at the time of her seizure, she is always at work.
Cecilia's Day,' both written for a musical society's annual festival in honor of the patron saint of their art, are finely spirited and among the most striking, though not most delicate, examples of onomatopoeia in all poetry.